Illustration of a man in a suit and tie using a balance scale labeled "inversiones pensiones" and "America Latina." The heavier side has stacks of paper currency. The lighter side has stacks of coins.
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See how the poorest retirees in Latin America have financed the most powerful economic groups in the...

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Drawing of man in a suit sitting at a table next to lots of money
Illustration by Héctor Huamán

Workers in nine Latin American countries have managed to save around $500 billion through their pension systems, but they do not know who they have been financing throughout the years.

Their pension funds are managed, through individual accounts, mostly by private firms. These companies receive a commission for making the money profitable through their investment decisions. The dissemination of this mechanism began in Chile 40 years ago.

Those private firms are known as AFPs in Chile, Peru, Colombia, El Salvador, and the Dominican Republic; as AFAPs in Uruguay; Afore in Mexico; and as OPCs in Costa Rica. Only in Panama are individual accounts managed by the state.

Where Is My Pension? reveals cases of companies that you probably would not have wanted to finance with if you had a say in it: environmental violators, labor violators, and companies investigated for corruption. The project reveals the role of workers as forced financiers of their governments.

To visit the Spanish-language interactive website A dónde va mi Pensión, click here.

The project’s dedicated website provides a multitude of related information. A quiz allows readers to calculate pension earnings in multiple countries and see where those funds have been invested. Investigative stories include: 

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