Projects

Launched January 9, 2020 Garry Pierre-Pierre, Vania André
“Dashed Dreams: Haiti Since the 2010 Quake” takes a look back at what’s transpired in Haiti since the earthquake and explores how far the politically-troubled country has come 10 years later.
Launched January 7, 2020 Jacopo Ottaviani
Makoko, one of the most crowded slums in Lagos, Nigeria, is finally being mapped—a project intertwined with the fight for property rights in the community.
Launched December 30, 2019 Marcia Biggs, Eric O’Connor
One year after the power struggle over Venezuela’s presidency, the country remains at a stalemate and its refugee crisis is second only to Syria. PBS NewsHour reports from inside Venezuela.
Launched December 19, 2019 Saul G. Elbein
Alaska's Native corporations preserved their cultures by logging their ancient forests. Can they lead the way to conserving what's left?
Launched December 11, 2019 Hana Elias, Eleonore Voisard
"Holding Fire" is a behind-the-scenes look at the work of a Yemeni immigrant and grassroots Muslim activist in South Brooklyn during a time of unprecedented Islamophobia.
Launched December 10, 2019 Rebecca Hamilton
The world watched in awe as the Sudanese people brought about the downfall of long-time dictator Omar al-Bashir in April 2019. Can Sudan now excavate itself from 30 years of dictatorship?
Launched December 9, 2019 Simon Ostrovsky
Will peace talks between Ukraine and Russia result in an end to the war in Eastern Ukraine?
Launched November 26, 2019 Dan Schwartz
Legend tells of an Andean society that lived before Christ and died by the heat of three suns. Andeans say this old ending has returned as global warming. Communities are building lakes to prepare.
Launched November 20, 2019 Hani Zaitoun
Hani Zaitoun examines Estonia's defense capabilities and its special relationship with its Russian neighbor and the Russian ethnic minority that makes up almost 30 percent of Estonia's population.
Launched November 18, 2019 Mariana Rivas
With the recent announcement that all stateless babies born of Venezuelan parents would receive Colombian citizenship, the international community saw it as a victory, a brave response in the face of crisis. But these refugee families’ problems are far from solved. 
Launched November 8, 2019 Mary Landers, Emily Jones
Rising seas pose a serious threat to septic and sewer systems, putting our water at risk of contamination. This project looks at the risks and possible solutions for these problems in Coastal Georgia.
Launched November 8, 2019 Elizabeth Flock
This story examines how the criminal justice system is not equipped to protect women who protect themselves. It is told through the lens of one case—the Alabama murder trial of Brittany Smith.
Launched November 6, 2019 Amna Nawaz, Frank Carlson
Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.
Launched November 5, 2019 Vandana Menon
To whom does the forest belong? To the people, the animals, or the state?
Launched October 31, 2019 Audrey Henson
Dementia is not a new concept to Japan. However, reishi mushrooms are.
Launched October 28, 2019 Gregory Scruggs
Forty thousand people live in substandard conditions in downtown Buenos Aires' Villa 31. With property deeds and infrastructure upgrades, can authorities finally resolve the eyesore on their front doorstep?
Launched October 28, 2019 Megan O’Toole, Jillian Kestler-D’Amours
A dispute over land ownership is at the center of fierce debate around a planned extension to Canada's Trans Mountain pipeline, which would cut through dozens of First Nations communities.
Launched October 25, 2019 Amber Lin
The rivalry between 'Democratic Taiwan' and the 'China Model' has lasted for seven decades. Has it now reached a tipping point? 
Launched October 23, 2019 Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans
Canada wants to supply New England with cheap, "clean" hydropower. But the region's mega-dams carry hidden costs to Inuit culture, the environment, and even the climate.
Launched October 17, 2019 James Whitlow Delano
A mysterious illness has taken the lives of 15 out of 180 members of a clan of Malaysia’s last hunter gatherers, the Batek.
Launched October 15, 2019 Nate Hegyi
Are the super rich better equipped than the federal government to save America's disappearing wildlands?
Launched October 14, 2019 Ayanna Eva Dickinson
The Chocoan Rainforest is one of the last coastal rainforests left on earth. A handful of groups and organizations in Ecuador have channeled the practice of participatory conservation in order to combat the ongoing destruction. 
Launched October 11, 2019 Tony Briscoe
Climate change is not only causing a crisis for our oceans and coasts, but it is also having a profound impact on the Great Lakes region. The Tribune visits each lake to examine the consequences.
Launched October 8, 2019 Ervin E. Dyer, PhD
In Port au Prince, Pastor Julio Volcy believes that to build a better Haiti, he must first build stronger Christians, preparing them to withstand poverty and oppression by living lives of integrity.