Projects

Launched February 20, 2020 Matt Black
Photographer Matt Black is documenting communities across the U.S. without access to clean drinking water, or, in some cases, without water at all.
Launched February 18, 2020 Elizabeth Barber
Sister Jean believes that God made us free. With that freedom, we made many terrible choices, like burning down the Amazon. Now, it is not God's job to save us -- that's up to people like Sister Jean.
Launched February 17, 2020 Ingrid Barros, Sabrina Felipe
How Flávio Dino's administration has violated the environmental rights of traditional communities in favor of commodity exploration and extraction with Chinese capital.
Launched February 14, 2020 Reese Erlich
How are ordinary Iranians reacting to heightened tensions with the U.S.?
Launched February 14, 2020 Juyoung Choi, Saad Ejaz
In the summer of 2019, more than 500 Yemenis refugees arrived at Jeju Island, South Korea. With their visas soon expiring, many face the risk of losing the lives they’ve built and returning to a war-torn Yemen.
Launched February 7, 2020 Saul G. Elbein, Joshua Cogan
Changing realities around climate and land stewardship are creating new possibilities around how Native communities manage and profit from their lands, by aligning ethics, sustainability, and profits.
Launched February 2, 2020 Lottie Joiner
Tired of American racism, Black Americans are moving to African countries like Ghana where they are free from systemic racism, prejudice, and discrimination.
Launched January 27, 2020 Andrew S. Lewis
Dr. Stewart Farrell and other coastal scientists have been warning that much of the iconic Jersey Shore will be erased by sea-level rise and storms over the next century. But is anyone listening?
Launched January 27, 2020 Meg Jones
Wisconsin Army National Guard members overseeing the training of Ukrainian armed forces are reluctant characters in the impeachment case against President Donald Trump.
Launched January 9, 2020 Garry Pierre-Pierre, Vania André
“Dashed Dreams: Haiti Since the 2010 Quake” takes a look back at what’s transpired in Haiti since the earthquake and explores how far the politically-troubled country has come 10 years later.
Launched January 7, 2020 Jacopo Ottaviani, Oluwatosin Adeshokan
Makoko, one of the most crowded slums in Lagos, Nigeria, is finally being mapped—a project intertwined with the fight for property rights in the community.
Launched December 30, 2019 Marcia Biggs, Eric O’Connor
One year after the power struggle over Venezuela’s presidency, the country remains at a stalemate and its refugee crisis is second only to Syria. PBS NewsHour reports from inside Venezuela.
Launched December 19, 2019 Saul G. Elbein
Alaska's Native corporations preserved their cultures by logging their ancient forests. Can they lead the way to conserving what's left?
Launched December 17, 2019 Fatima Bhojani
Ten years after Taliban rule, Malala's hometown is a success story.
Launched December 11, 2019 Hana Elias, Eleonore Voisard
"Holding Fire" is a behind-the-scenes look at the work of a Yemeni immigrant and grassroots Muslim activist in South Brooklyn during a time of unprecedented Islamophobia.
Launched December 10, 2019 Rebecca Hamilton
The world watched in awe as the Sudanese people brought about the downfall of long-time dictator Omar al-Bashir in April 2019. Can Sudan now excavate itself from 30 years of dictatorship?
Launched December 9, 2019 Simon Ostrovsky
Will peace talks between Ukraine and Russia result in an end to the war in Eastern Ukraine?
Launched November 26, 2019 Dan Schwartz
Legend tells of an Andean society that lived before Christ and died by the heat of three suns. Andeans say this old ending has returned as global warming. Communities are building lakes to prepare.
Launched November 20, 2019 Hani Zaitoun
Hani Zaitoun examines Estonia's defense capabilities and its special relationship with its Russian neighbor and the Russian ethnic minority that makes up almost 30 percent of Estonia's population.
Launched November 18, 2019 Mariana Rivas
With the recent announcement that all stateless babies born of Venezuelan parents would receive Colombian citizenship, the international community saw it as a victory, a brave response in the face of crisis. But these refugee families’ problems are far from solved. 
Launched November 8, 2019 Mary Landers, Emily Jones
Rising seas pose a serious threat to septic and sewer systems, putting our water at risk of contamination. This project looks at the risks and possible solutions for these problems in Coastal Georgia.
Launched November 8, 2019 Elizabeth Flock
This story examines how the criminal justice system is not equipped to protect women who protect themselves. It is told through the lens of one case—the Alabama murder trial of Brittany Smith.
Launched November 6, 2019 Amna Nawaz, Frank Carlson
Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.
Launched November 6, 2019 Zack Beauchamp
The famous line about Israel is that it's "the only democracy in the Middle East." But the foundation of its liberal democracy are crumbling — and may be in worse shape than most people understand.