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Activists Beaten by Police After March from Bella Center

Youth activists were beaten by police this morning in Copenhagen after they marched out of the Bella Center, shouting "Reclaim power!" and "Climate justice now!"

During the second week of the COP15 talks in Copenhagen, the number of activists allowed to attend the talks has been drastically reduced. By Friday, when President Obama arrives, the number of nongovernmental "observers," the UN group to which most of the activists belong, will be reduced to just 90.

Houseboats Struggling in Kashmir

Rebecca Byerly reports for Voice of America on the struggling houseboat industry in Kashmir. This report is part of Pulitzer Center-sponsored project "Paradise Lost: Kashmir's Vanishing Glaciers, Waters, and Forests"

Crude Awakening

The World Bank-supported Chad-Cameroon oil pipeline has been operational for over six years, but the controversy surrounding the so-called oil for development project has hardly died down.

The 1070 km (670 mile) pipeline transports oil from the Doba fields of southwestern Chad to a marine loading terminal off the Atlantic coast near Cameroon. From one end of the pipeline to the other, project partners raised the hopes and expectations of local populations.

But today, for those who had no real choice or say about the project, the disappointment is profound.

Postcard from Saturday's Mass Climate Demonstration

Saturday's mass march to the Bella Center, where climate talks are ongoing, was boisterous and colorful, but largely peaceful.

I expect that the tone of the demonstrations will shift in the next week as climate activists make a last-ditch push for a strong treaty. Climate Justice Action, an anti-corporate network, is calling on activists to disrupt the negotiations at the Bella Center next Wednesday and to transform it into an assembly open to all:

Pakistan: "Pakistan is more united" than ever--Gallup

The other day, I posted an interview with Gallup's Pakistan chief, Dr. Ijaz Gilani, in which he explained how electoral data belies the conventional wisdom that the present government is on the verge of political collapse. In the second half of our discussion, he applied a similar counterintuitive approach to substantive policy problems, namely the economy, counterterrorism, and civil war.

Where the first half of our chat focused on inside baseball, this one is pretty self-explanatory. But still, two significant implications:

Off to a Running Start

The Copenhagen Conference, where I arrived today, is hard to describe, because so much is happening here and the stakes of this climate negotiation are so high. Outside, a persistent crowd of protesters chanted environmental slogans. Two young Asian woman strutted in chicken suits. Many others men and women of all different races and nationalities waved placards and signs. A bus-size screen showed environmental movies. (Look at my video of one activist promoting vegetarian eating to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas produced.

Pakistan: Will he stay or will he go?

When I started on this trip, I planned to post 1-2 videos a week. For the first month, that's not been possible, because Islamabad has pretty much outlawed videotaping anywhere in the city. I've been stopped and ID'ed and questioned several times while trying to snap still images, and even inside buildings, officials are unwilling to go on camera. Since Tuesday, however, I've been in Karachi, where the rules are a little more lenient. Hopefully more visual aids will follow.