Country

Syria

Inside Syria

Journalist and author Reese Erlich talks about Libyan dictator Moamar Gaddafi's death and whether the Assad regime in Syria might be the next to fall.

Syrian Kurds Have Long Memories

To escape a government crackdown in 2004, thousands of Syrian Kurds fled across the border to Iraq. Many still live there today—a constant reminder of Syrian repression.

Syria: Daring the Authorities in Dara

After harsh crackdowns on demonstrators across the country, the Syrian regime claims it has regained control of the situation. But public displays of opposition are still evident, even in the schoolyard.

The Architect of 9/11

Daniel Brook's Pulitzer Center project on Mohamed Atta, "The Architect of 9/11," was featured in a segment on WBUR's "Here and Now" on Nov. 9.

The Architect of 9/11

The photographs above correspond to Brook's three pieces published by Slate. The items labeled "Dispatch 1" are associated to his 9/08 piece, "Dispatch 2" to 9/09, and "Dispatch 3" to 9/10.

In Aleppo, Syria, Mohamed Atta Thought He Could Build the Ideal Islamic City

In 1994, Mohamed Atta traveled to Istanbul with a student group and continued onward to visit Dittmar Machule in northern Syria, where the professor was doing fieldwork on a Bronze Age village under excavation. But Atta found himself more interested in the traditional urbanism of the nearest major city, Aleppo. Atta was hardly the first student of Middle Eastern architecture drawn to Aleppo. Along with Fez in Morocco and Sana'a in Yemen, Aleppo is considered among the best-preserved cities in the Arab world.

A Few Are Willing to Risk the Return to Baghdad

JARAMANA, Syria -- Hasem Abed is thinking about going back to Iraq.

The small-time auto trader, 32, left Diyala earlier this year after members of a Shia militia destroyed his house.

He says this town outside Damascus has been more secure, but he has run out of money and has been unable to find work. He is thinking of trying his luck in Baghdad.

Hassam Abdul Rahman might join him. Life in Iraq, the 42-year-old mechanical engineer says, "is very bad." But he, too, has exhausted his savings in Syria.

'You Cannot Turn Your Back'

WASHINGTON -- After a stranger snapped her photograph as she entered the Green Zone, Tina Raad's family begged her to get out of Iraq.

At first, she resisted. The Iraqi woman had sought work with the U.S. Agency for International Development in Baghdad because she wanted to join in the reconstruction of her country.

But in the eyes of Iraqi insurgents, such collaboration made her a traitor. Changing her dress, varying the route she took to work and altering her hours had not stopped their threats. When her mother and three siblings fled Iraq, she relented.