Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

Venezuela: Easing Restrictions While COVID-19 Cases Go Up

After two-and-a-half months of quarantine, Venezuelan authorities approved a plan to ease restrictions and resume activities in eight economic sectors, starting June 1st. However, Venezuela does not meet the public health criteria set by the World Health Organization to ease lockdown restrictions safely.

Biden Still Wants to Close Guantánamo Prison

The Obama administration ran into a wall of political opposition when it tried to close Guantánamo Prison. The former vice president rarely brings up the topic and has yet to draw up a strategy but says he shares the goal.

Valley of Unrest

There are now nearly one million Indian troops stationed in Kashmir—more than at the height of the insurgency in the Nineties. The Muslim-majority region and its residents face a rising tide of Hindu nationalism.

The 1857 Project: Extracting the Poison of Racism From America’s Soul

In its spring 2020 print issue, GJR explores the history of race in the Land of Dred Scott. Call it the 1857 project because one of the most important chapters in the nation’s story occurred here with the Dred Scott decision reading blacks out of the Constitution and the Lincoln-Douglas debates the next year over whether America could endure part slave and part free. 

Southeast Asia in the Strongman Era

The "new authoritarianism" is on the rise in Southeast Asia, personified by Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines and Thailand's Prayuth Chan Ocha. Are they not just the present, but the future as well?

Renovating Villa 31

Forty thousand people live in substandard conditions in downtown Buenos Aires' Villa 31. With property deeds and infrastructure upgrades, can authorities finally resolve the eyesore on their front doorstep?

The Silent War

The rivalry between 'Democratic Taiwan' and the 'China Model' has lasted for seven decades. Has it now reached a tipping point?

Kashmir: Life Under Siege

In August 2019, India scrapped Kashmir's special status, moving in extra troops, suspending communication, and arresting thousands. This is the story of the women and children who were left behind.

A Revolution for Puerto Rico's Afro-Latinos

In the midst of Puerto Rico's political crisis, its black communities fight for justice to address invisible racism, police oppression, gentrification, substandard schools, and economic disparities.

Femme Force: Women’s Contributions to Ukraine’s War

When war came to eastern Ukraine, an unsuspecting population raced to action. Whether it be in the military, as a volunteer, or simply as a resident of an occupied town, women’s experiences do not reflect those of their brethren.

A Cryptocurrency Rush In The Grey Zone

Why is there a rush for cryptocurrencies in places that don't exist? A story set in the post-Soviet space, where ultra-libertarianism meets kleptocracy and sanctions evasion.

Cops and Robbers

A Baltimore Sun investigation into a rogue squad of police officers who used the authority of the badge to commit crimes—and how they got away with it for so long.

The Tree of Life

In the aftermath of the worst anti-Semitic slaughter in United States history, the neighborhood of Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, relies on a century of deep urban community to cope with trauma.

Meet the Journalist: Mark O'Connell

Mark O'Connell travels to New Zealand to investigate how an extremist libertarian manifesto from 1997 influenced Silicon Valley libertarians like Peter Thiel to acquire apocalypse boltholes in New Zealand.

Meet the Journalist: Reese Erlich

President Trump has said he will tear up the Iranian nuclear accord. What do ordinary Iranians think of this and other Trump policies? Journalist Reese Erlich produced this video in Tehran.

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.