Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

Will Kinmen, Taiwan’s Frontline, Become the Next Crimea?

Kinmen, the closest island territory of Taiwan to China and once a part of the international anti-communism battlefront, has today become part of China’s “Unification” plan for Taiwan. While ‘One Country, two Systems’ is facing an unprecedented challenge in Hong Kong, the propaganda for Taiwan continues. Meanwhile, a referendum on a ‘One Country, two Systems Experimental Zone’ has been quietly unfolding on Kinmen.

Ukraine, Russia Prepare for Peace Talks After Years of War

After nearly six years of war, the Ukrainian and Russian presidents are preparing to meet this week for the first time. The historic peace talks come as impeachment hearings continue in the U.S. Simon Ostrovsky reports from the frontlines of eastern Ukraine with a look ahead at the negotiations that could change the fate of those living in conflict.

The Hour of Lynching: Vigilante Violence in India

Returning home after buying two milch cows, dairy farmer Rakbar Khan was lynched by a mob of “cow vigilantes”. His wife seeks meaning in mourning his death, while his perpetrators deny it.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

No Journalism Left In Rural India?

More Indians live in rural areas than the entire population of Europe. What does it mean for them if journalism dies a painful death?

Modi's Greatest Threat

In the wake of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's sweeping reelection last May, journalist Maddy Crowell looks at the wide-ranging voices of dissent in India – the people and places that are working to defend the image of a pluralistic and tolerant India against the swelling tide of Hindu nationalism.

A Lost Nation in the Caucasus

In the Caucasus mountains, members of the most scattered people in the world—the Circassians—are starting to come home following a decade of concerted online activism.

Civil Asset Forfeiture in St. Louis

Liberal and conservative justices criticize abuses of civil asset forfeiture. Groups from CATO to the ACLU do too. Republicans and Democrats want change, but much of the reform agenda is unfinished.

Honduras Corruption Investigation

An in-depth investigation into the endemic corruption that plagues social welfare programs in Honduras, stifling the country's development and driving migration to the north.

Venezuela: The Endgame?

With self-declared interim president Juan Guaido challenging to take the presidency from Maduro, how will the country overcome its deepest political impasse yet?

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: The U.S.-Mexico Border: A View from Above

This week: Trump's plan to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico is still in question, a growing alliance between Russia and the Central African Republic threaten the U.S.'s influence in the region, and see the highlights of the Pulitzer Center's recent conference weekend.