Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How China’s High-Tech ‘Eyes’ Monitor Behavior and Dissent

Technology is transforming China, helping improve life in some ways, but also collecting big data. The government is beginning to convert that data and surveillance footage into social credit scores, which critics say can be used to penalize those who criticize the Communist Party. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

China’s Massive Belt and Road Initiative Builds Global Infrastructure — and Influence

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is the most expensive infrastructure project in history. Chinese companies are constructing roads, pipelines and railroads across the globe. But they are also building China’s influence, and critics in the U.S. and Asia worry Belt and Road projects can reduce countries’ sovereignty and grow Chinese power. With the help of the Pulitzer Center, Nick Schifrin reports.

How President Xi Jinping Is Transforming China at Home and Abroad

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s philosophy has been written into the country’s constitution. He has sought to raise the standard of living at home, while boosting China’s power and influence across the globe. But critics accuse him of consolidating power and creating a campaign of oppression against the Chinese people—especially those who disagree with him. Nick Schifrin reports from Beijing.

Life in a Dying Democracy

Hungary's democracy is on the brink of total collapse. How could this happen in an advanced European nation? And what does Hungary's crisis mean for the future of democracy globally?

Helping the Poor: What Works in Rwanda?

Governments, foundations, and nonprofits aim to help the world's poorest people by giving them livestock, cash, training, and education. What works best? How do we know?

A Journey Through Contested Lands: Tanzania

A moving photo essay about the Maasai in northeast Tanzania, who are struggling to make a living on ancestral lands that the government keeps trying to take away.

The Prison Next Door

Brazil’s prison system is in crisis. The wives and mothers of inmates at Alcaçuz—some who live right next door to the maximum-security prison—are its unseen victims.

Europe's New Nationalisms

In the last two years, voters across Europe have elected new governments whose platforms rest, in more or less explicit ways, on the politics of "identitarianism."

Losing Earth

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

The Enduring Allure of Mexico's Zapatistas

An army of campesinos armed with little but words, a social movement, and a radical democratic project buried deep in the Mexican jungle: The Zapatistas defy easy categorization. This is their story.

Pretrial Diversion

Pretrial diversion–where defendants pay fees to avoid prison time–are increasing popular. But some government agents are profiting from people's inability to pay the fees.

How Saudi Arabia's Reforms Mask Political Oppression

Recently, Saudi Arabia has marketed a new image as a more liberal, modernizing nation. Yet at home, the government is cracking down on political expression of all kinds with unprecedented aggression.

Meet the Journalist: Carrie Ching

Producer Carrie Ching explains how she created an animated video depicting the unseen victims of offshore finance for The Panama Papers project with ICIJ reporters, editors, and artist Arthur Jones.

Meet the Journalist: Tracey Eaton

Tracey Eaton discusses his project, "Cuban Youth: A New Dawn?" Eaton, the former Havana bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, interviewed 20-somethings about their hopes and dreams for the future.

Meet the Journalist: Uri Blau

Uri Blau used U.S. and Israeli tax records to connect the dots between American tax-exempt charities and their Israeli beneficiaries operating over the Green Line.

This Week: Where Domestic Abuse Is Tolerated

This week: a harrowing look into Russian domestic violence, a special investigation into how Jewish Federations spend their money, and how Qatar is jailing new mothers and their babies.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.

This Week: The President's Wealth

This week: President Kabila's vast network of family-owned businesses, a comedy group in India fights ISIS with laughter, and Syrian refugees look for a sense of belonging in Germany.

Migration and Refugees Lesson Plans

The following lesson plans for middle school teachers, high school teachers and college professors introduce reporting connected to migration and the experiences of refugees.

Technology and Activism in Mexico

The following global affairs lesson plan for history, ELA, Spanish and Humanities teachers investigates the use of technology in Mexico to combat corruption, and the impacts of that activism.

Visualizing the Drones Debate

Students examine details from photojournalist Tomas van Houtryve's drone photography project "Blue Sky Days" to analyze the author's purpose for the project and design their own visual arts projects.

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.