Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

Six Years After Ferguson, Barriers to Voting Persist

The shooting of Michael Brown in late summer of 2014 started a national conversation about police racism and brutality; and in St. Louis, it started a renaissance of the city’s history of organizing, activism, and engagement in politics. Despite the progress, harsh voter ID laws and socioeconomic and cultural obstacles limit numbers at the polls.

Life in a Dying Democracy

Hungary's democracy is on the brink of total collapse. How could this happen in an advanced European nation? And what does Hungary's crisis mean for the future of democracy globally?

Helping the Poor: What Works in Rwanda?

Governments, foundations, and nonprofits aim to help the world's poorest people by giving them livestock, cash, training, and education. What works best? How do we know?

A Journey Through Contested Lands: Tanzania

A moving photo essay about the Maasai in northeast Tanzania, who are struggling to make a living on ancestral lands that the government keeps trying to take away.

The Prison Next Door

Brazil’s prison system is in crisis. The wives and mothers of inmates at Alcaçuz—some who live right next door to the maximum-security prison—are its unseen victims.

Europe's New Nationalisms

In the last two years, voters across Europe have elected new governments whose platforms rest, in more or less explicit ways, on the politics of "identitarianism."

Losing Earth

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

The Enduring Allure of Mexico's Zapatistas

An army of campesinos armed with little but words, a social movement, and a radical democratic project buried deep in the Mexican jungle: The Zapatistas defy easy categorization. This is their story.

Pretrial Diversion

Pretrial diversion–where defendants pay fees to avoid prison time–are increasing popular. But some government agents are profiting from people's inability to pay the fees.

How Saudi Arabia's Reforms Mask Political Oppression

Recently, Saudi Arabia has marketed a new image as a more liberal, modernizing nation. Yet at home, the government is cracking down on political expression of all kinds with unprecedented aggression.

Meet the Journalist: Tracey Eaton

Tracey Eaton discusses his project, "Cuban Youth: A New Dawn?" Eaton, the former Havana bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, interviewed 20-somethings about their hopes and dreams for the future.

Meet the Journalist: Uri Blau

Uri Blau used U.S. and Israeli tax records to connect the dots between American tax-exempt charities and their Israeli beneficiaries operating over the Green Line.

Meet the Journalist: Chris Arsenault

What happens when investors look for land deals in Africa? Journalist Chris Arsenault looks at what is happening to the Libyan government's 100,00 hectare land grab in Mali.

This Week: Botched Land Grab Along the Border

This week: A land grab at the U.S.-Mexico border reveals how the government might go about building the wall, a history of land grabs by the government are revealed by a laundry list of treaties with American Indian nations, and the women taking on military duty in the Central African Republic.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.

This Week: Where Domestic Abuse Is Tolerated

This week: a harrowing look into Russian domestic violence, a special investigation into how Jewish Federations spend their money, and how Qatar is jailing new mothers and their babies.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.

Exploring Downstream: Water Resources

Through this webquest, students use several different projects on the "Downstream" web portal to examine the impact of water resources on a wide range of communities around the world.

Exploring Fragile States: Sudan

Sudan has been a "fragile state" for more than two decades. Through this webquest, students are able to explore this complex country using several different reporting projects on Sudan.

International Adoption: Ethics and Effects

This is a multi-week unit on international adoption and ethics. Students will examine how international adoption agencies work and the role of culture, ethics, local policy, and international law.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.