Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

Broken Justice, Episode 2: How Did We Get Here?

Americans didn't always have the right to an attorney. It all started with a pool hall robbery in Florida, and a drifter named Clarence Earl Gideon.

Broken Justice, Episode 1: 'Triage'

Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.

Afghan and Pakistani Women Against Extremism

What do Afghan and Pakistani women see as the roots of violent extremism, and how are some of them working together to build peace? Who are the women who are fighting to be more than mere victims?

Bolsonaro and the Brazilian Amazon

Under the presidency of Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s indigenous communities are bracing for an escalation of repression, encroachment, and displacement throughout the Amazon and the rainforest frontier.

The North Korean Underground Railroad

The North Korean underground railroad is credited with saving thousands of lives over the last two decades—but now Kim Jong-un is on the verge of destroying it.

Asset Forfeiture in Texas

In each of Texas' 254 counties, a host of local agencies can use civil asset forfeiture to help cover their expenses. But the system's lack of transparency and accountability makes it ripe for abuse.

Trump's World

America is exporting a different set of ideas to the world under the leadership of President Trump.

Colombia: After the Peace Deal

After the deal, the hard work: an investigation looking at the successes and failures of Colombia’s peace agreement with the FARC guerrilla group.

Ohio Property Records

Ohio is one of the largest states in the nation. But a strong tradition of local rule makes finding records difficult across county lines. This data project delves into that problem and looks at patterns of ownership throughout the state.

The Murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia

In October 2017, the most famous investigative journalist on the island of Malta, Daphne Caruana Galizia, was murdered by a car bomb while driving home from work. Why?

The Ballymurphy Precedent

In The Ballymurphy Precedent, Collum Macrae probes the killings of 10 unarmed Catholics, including a priest and a mother of eight, in the West Belfast housing estate of Ballymurphy in August, 1971.

Foreign Influence in the Balkans

Krithika Varagur reports on foreign religious and political investment in the Balkans, focusing on Bosnia and Kosovo, which have been affected by both rising extremism and populism.

Meet the Journalist: Vince Beiser

"The most important solid substance on earth," Vince Beiser tells us, is sand—used to build skyscrapers and shopping malls from Boston to Beijing. But the world is running out.

Meet the Journalist: Kai Schultz

Kai Schultz reports from the Maldives on its transition to democracy, the misappropriation of tourist taxes, safety at resorts, and the growing fear of Islamic radicalization.

Meet the Journalist: Rachel Oswald

CQ Roll Call foreign policy reporter Rachel Oswald discusses her summer 2015 Pulitzer Center reporting trip to Moscow where she focused on the breakdown in U.S.-Russia nuclear confidence.

Meet the Journalist: Ewen MacAskill

Ewen MacAskill visits Villa Grimaldi, a secret detention center in Chile, while uncovering the story of Roberto Kozak, a diplomat who helped save 30,000 prisoners after the 1973 military coup.

Meet the Journalist: Lauren Markham

Meet Lauren Markham, a journalist reporting from El Salvador for the Pulitzer Center and VQR Magazine about the mounting violence in the capital city and prospects of meaningful change.

This Week: Botched Land Grab Along the Border

This week: A land grab at the U.S.-Mexico border reveals how the government might go about building the wall, a history of land grabs by the government are revealed by a laundry list of treaties with American Indian nations, and the women taking on military duty in the Central African Republic.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.