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Congo: The Forgotten War

The conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo is threatening to become a full scale war. Last week, rebel commanders seized an army base and the headquarters of Congo's famous Virunga National Park. The latest round of fighting has seen a dramatic rise in the number of rapes. Some 200,000 people have been displaced since August, according to the World Food Program. That's in addition to the nearly 1.5 million people already displaced since 2007. The so–called "forgotten war" isn't over. We'll look into the history of the crisis in the Congo today.

News from Goma

Recent fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo has forced more than 100,000 people to flee their homes in the last week alone and humanitarian aid groups are overwhelmed. Many who need food and medical assistance can't be reached because of the fighting. As Michael Kavanagh shares in this Reporter's Notebook, the Congolese people have an unfortunate history of being left to their own devices.

More Violence in Congo

Reporter Michael Kavanagh has the latest from eastern Congo, where fighting between pro-government forces and Tutsi rebels has displaced more than a quarter million people.

As Congo Rebels Advance, Civilians Target U.N.

Angry civilians attacked U.N. offices in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, accusing U.N. peacekeeping troops of failing to protect them.

No News is Bad News

Sitting, waiting, sweating. When you live on the margins in Sudan, there's nothing much behind you, and nothing much in front to look forward to.

And get over any romantic notions about hardy stoic villagers. The people of the Nubian desert tell us they don't like it. And they gather each day in their homes made of mud to share tea and some grinding certainties.

Hijacker

One of the worst places in the world to be a woman is the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Dzieciolowski's Russian radio reports

Zygmunt Dzieciolowski has been contributing to Russian radio stations on the Georgian conflict and its consequences. Videographer Jason Maloney, who is on the ground with Dzieciolowski, says that “this is extremely important from the perspective that he's really filling a void here, where there is really no other independent reporting available in the Russian language." Dzieciolowski spoke to the following stations:
 

Clashes in Georgia

Freelance video journalist Jason Maloney, who was filming in Georgia for the Pulitzer Center at the time of the fighting, describes the tensions that preceded the clashes and the impacts on the region. (MP3)

Listen to Jason's dispatch at Newshour.

The Poker Game of Power in the Caucasus

In the war between Georgia and its renegade provinces, Russia is cooking up its own soup.

The Georgian president wanted to finally fuflfill his dream when he sent his troops in last week on a mission against South Ossetia. Ever since Michail Saakaschwili came to power in November 2003 through the "Rose Revolution," his priorities have been clear: more important than economic reform, joining NATO and the fight against corruption were the reconquest of the renegade provinces of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. ...

Oil and Justice in the Amazon

Pulitzer Center grantee Kelly Hearn talks to NPR On Point about the historic environmental lawsuit filed by indigenous people of Ecuador's Amazonian rainforest against U.S.-based oil company Chevron.