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Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

Greece’s Forgotten Child Refugees

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Reporting Fellow alum Divya Mishra reports on how the pandemic has left thousands of unaccompanied minors in Greece without adequate shelter or food.

Between Borders

From a doctor stranded in Ciudad Juárez to a shelter closed after an outbreak, COVID-19 is hitting hard along the Texas-Mexico border.

Biden Still Wants to Close Guantánamo Prison

The Obama administration ran into a wall of political opposition when it tried to close Guantánamo Prison. The former vice president rarely brings up the topic and has yet to draw up a strategy but says he shares the goal.

Valley of Unrest

There are now nearly one million Indian troops stationed in Kashmir—more than at the height of the insurgency in the Nineties. The Muslim-majority region and its residents face a rising tide of Hindu nationalism.

After COVID: Feminist Policies Save Lives and Uphold Rights

The patriarchal policies across MENA came into full play during COVID-19 as women’s vulnerability and burden increased exponentially against a system that was, even before the pandemic, broken and unable to protect women.

The 1857 Project

The 1857 Project tells the story of race in St. Louis, Missouri, and Illinois. The 1857 Dred Scott decision denying blacks humanity and the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates were the prelude to Civil War.

Ukraine's War: Lives Frozen By Conflict

Paula Bronstein's focus is Ukraine's vulnerable, fragile elderly population trapped by an endless war that sees their lives frozen by conflict, impoverished, living in dilapidated homes.

The Orange Areas of Central India

Over 1.5 million people in central India live in the crossfire of a 50-year old land dispute between two government departments over who governs lands known as Orange Areas.

The Moving Border

Latino USA, led by veteran journalist Maria Hinojosa, reports on the real-life impact the Trump administration’s latest policies are having on refugees seeking asylum via the U.S. southern border.

Holding Fire

"Holding Fire" is a behind-the-scenes look at the work of a Yemeni immigrant and grassroots Muslim activist in South Brooklyn during a time of unprecedented Islamophobia.

Broken Justice

Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.

Renovating Villa 31

Forty thousand people live in substandard conditions in downtown Buenos Aires' Villa 31. With property deeds and infrastructure upgrades, can authorities finally resolve the eyesore on their front doorstep?

The Thin Red Line

Despite sharp international criticism, a Russian geneticist is pushing forward a project to edit embryos of a deaf couple so their children won't inherit the mutation that impairs their hearing.

Outsourcing Migrants

The Associated Press examines what happens to asylum-seekers when Europe and the United States close their doors, outsourcing migrants to other countries.

Examining Domestic Violence in Lagos, Nigeria

Lagos' secretive culture has made it harder to tackle domestic violence. Regardless, women are resisting the secrecy, changing the culture, and speaking about their experiences.

Meet the Journalist: Jessica Prokop

After Motel 6 gave the name of an undocumented immigrant to the authorities, his family was torn apart. The Columbian reports from the U.S.-Mexico border, where the family is navigating a life divided.

Meet the Journalists: Texas Tribune Staff

After a new federal immigration policy led to hundreds of children being separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, The Texas Tribune opened a temporary South Texas bureau to investigate.