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Can Sustainable Farming Save Iowa’s Precious Soil and Water?

Iowa is a powerhouse producer of corn and soybeans. But all the industrial farming has come at a cost to the environment. Today, there's a growing number of farmers adopting more sustainable practices in a bid to save Iowa's precious soil and water.

Haiti and the Failed Promise of US Aid

After an earthquake struck in 2010, the US pledged to help rebuild the Caribbean country. A decade later, nothing better symbolises the failure of these efforts than the story of a new port that was promised but never built.

The Next Yellowstone

Are the super rich better equipped than the federal government to save America's disappearing wildlands?

Migrants at the Border

The U.S. government and migrants seeking asylum find themselves in a precarious situation as the situation on the border worsens.

Cape Cod: At the Edge of a Warming World

Come with us as we explore Cape Cod to better understand what climate change is doing here, what it means for the future of this beloved place, and what the cost of inaction could be.

After the Ice

The Bering Sea's winter ice has helped to sustain a remarkable abundance of sea life. For the past two years, it's been gone, and scientists are scrambling to figure out what that means for the future.

Race, Reunion, and Redemption

Judy Gladney and her late husband, Eric Vickers, were among the first African Americans to attend their suburban St. Louis high school. As her 50th class reunion approaches, Judy describes their struggle.

A Revolution for Puerto Rico's Afro-Latinos

In the midst of Puerto Rico's political crisis, its black communities fight for justice to address invisible racism, police oppression, gentrification, substandard schools, and economic disparities.

Growing Up Through the Cracks

When half the kids are in poverty, our fractured towns can offer no future. This project explore the causes and effects of concentrated child poverty—and what other communities are doing to address it.

Borderland Sisterhood

In 2018, hundreds of nuns descended on the U.S.-Mexico border to volunteer in migrant shelters. Many have stayed to continue their work, citing a “calling” unlike any they have felt before.

PBS NewsHour Weekend 'Future of Food' Series

Can we create a nutritious and affordable food system in a way that’s green and fair? PBS NewsHour Weekend’s "Future of Food" international series reports on work by people who think they have solutions.

Cops and Robbers

A Baltimore Sun investigation into a rogue squad of police officers who used the authority of the badge to commit crimes—and how they got away with it for so long.

The Tree of Life

In the aftermath of the worst anti-Semitic slaughter in United States history, the neighborhood of Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, relies on a century of deep urban community to cope with trauma.

She's Not a Boy

“She’s Not a Boy” is the story of Tatenda Ngwaru, an asylum-seeking intersex woman who fled Zimbabwe with sixty dollars and the hope that she would finally find a place where she belonged.

Meet the Journalist: Zahra Ahmad

In Feb. 2019, journalist Zahra Ahmad returned to Iraq to reunite with her family for the first time since immigrating to the U.S in 1998. Here she explains what sparked her trip and what she learned.

Meet The Journalist: Marcia Biggs

At the height of the U.S. immigration debate, Marcia Biggs goes to ground zero of the Central American refugee crisis and the origin of migrant caravans to find out why people are being forced to flee.  

Congress Heights' Middle Schoolers Explore Journalism at USA Today

Students from Center City Public Charter School attend a three-day workshop inspired by the award-winning series ‘Pumped Dry'—learning about groundwater depletion, talking to the journalists behind the project and then tour USA Today's newsroom.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa McCart

Restaurateur Mike Chen legally hired expert noodle-pullers from Taiwan to create an authentic noodle house in Pittsburgh, until the Trump administration’s immigration policy changes put an end to it.

Meet the Journalist: Jaime Joyce

In the United States, one in every 28 children has a parent in jail or in prison. TIME for Kids executive editor Jaime Joyce reports on two programs that help families stay connected.

Meet the Journalist: Amy Martin

Threshold is a public radio show and podcast tackling one pressing environmental issue each season. The show aims to be a home for nuanced journalism about human relationships with the natural world.

2019 Reporting Fellows Washington Weekend Highlights

The Pulitzer Center's 2019 Reporting Fellows gather in Washington, D.C., for two days of panel discussions and a formal dinner to celebrate the work of Fellows in the Pulitzer Center's Campus Consortium partner schools.

Pulitzer Center Announces 2019 Connected Coastlines Grantees

The Pulitzer Center is pleased to announce our 2019 Connected Coastlines grantees, a consortium of newsrooms and independent journalists across the United States who are using rigorous science reporting to document and explain the local effects of climate change on U.S. coastal populations. 

Back to School: Catching up with the World

At the start of the school year, students might want to discuss global issues that arose over the summer. This lesson is intended to spark discussion on current events and ways to keep up with them.

Activities to Extend Student Engagement

Standards-aligned activities drawing from concepts in the essays, creative texts, photographs, and illustrations to engage students in creative and challenging ways.

Future of Food

This lesson introduces the question: Can we create a nutritious and affordable food system in a way that’s green and fair?

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