Country

Jordan

Iraq: In Northeast Baltimore, a 'typical American family'

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Baltimore, MD

I was invited to dinner last night by a family that in some ways typifies the Iraqi resettlement experience.

Abu Rawan is a 62-year-old engineer who served as an interpreter and adviser to U.S. commanders and diplomats after the 2003 invasion. His wife is a pediatrician; they have two sons, aged 13 and 14.

Iraq: U.S. resettlements off to another slow start

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Washington, DC

After admitting record numbers of Iraqi refugees in the final months of fiscal 2008, the United States is off to a slow start in the first months of the fiscal '09.

The country admitted 705 Iraqis as refugees in October and 738 in November, according to numbers released last week by the State Department. That's a steep decline from the more than 2,000 per month who landed here in July, August and September.

Iraq: A tradition of welcome, threatened

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Washington, DC

There is broad agreement that the arrival of more than 1 million Iraqis has taxed the water supply in Syria, burdened the public education and health care systems and driven up housing prices.

Imad Moustapha worries that their presence is exacting another cost.

Iraq: 'No reason to celebrate'

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Washington, DC

The United States has met its goal of resettling 12,000 Iraqi refugees for the fiscal year, with a thousand more due to arrive by the end of the month, officials announced this morning.

With the system for processing Iraqis now "robust," Ambassador James Foley told reporters, the United States expects to admit at least 17,000 more refugees in 2009.

Iraqi refugees: Perspectives on the U.S. responsibility

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Washington, DC

Last week, Joost Hiltermann of the International Crisis Group became the latest in a series of refugee advocates to tell me that the United States owed a special obligation to the Iraqis that have fled the country since the 2003 invasion.

The Iraqi exodus: A second wave?

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Washington, DC

While the Iraqi refugee populations in Syria, Jordan and other neighbors appear to have stabilized, one analyst in the region says conditions in Iraq suggest the possibility of another exodus.

Syria: A complicated relationship

Matthew Hay Brown, for the Pulitzer Center
Damascus, Syria

The relationship between Iraqi refugees and their hosts in Syria and Jordan is complicated.

On the one hand, I have heard much talk of Arab brotherhood among both officials and ordinary people in the two countries. On the other, Iraqis in both countries are blamed for rising prices and housing costs.

Salaam Marougi says he understands the negative reactions he occasionally encounters.