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International Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund aims to support and build capacity of local, regional, and international journalists reporting on issues related to tropical rainforests. International reporting reaches audiences outside the main rainforest regions and helps create global awareness of tropical rainforest issues. International reporting on rainforest issues can show how local rainforest issues are linked to global trends, and how global events can impact local (especially Indigenous or traditional) communities and landscapes in tropical rainforests. The Rainforest Journalism Fund’s regional advisory committees provide insights on international reporting proposals, but international projects are reviewed by the Pulitzer Center.

Learn more about the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

Mercury: Chasing the Quicksilver

Five hundred years after Spanish conquistadors arrived, gold is still a driving economic force in South America's Guiana Shield. But the industry depends on another element, one with deadly side effects for miners and rainforests: mercury.

The Toxic Metal in the Shadow of the Gold Industry

Two commodities that are frequently taken over illegally are gold and mercury, and in the Guiana Shield region, one does not go without the other. Mercury has grave impacts on human health and the environment, but efforts so far to curtail its use in the gold industry have only pushed supply chains underground. 

The Dirty Secret Behind the West's Coconut Fad

At a time when the demand for coconut products is exploding in the developed world, the 8 million farmers growing the fruit are far from benefiting — they face a widening gap between the value of their products in the West and what they earn.

The Triumph Over the River That Defeated Henry Ford (Spanish)

On the banks of the Tapajós River, one of the largest tributaries of the Amazon, a development policy was implemented years ago to turn the region into an important world corridor for Brazilian soybeans. There lies American car mogul Henry Ford’s failed factory city.

Siona: Amazon’s Defenders Under Threat

Adiela, a Siona Indigenous leader, follows the spiritual guidance of her elders and clears landmines from her ancestral territory in the Colombian Amazon, in hope that her people may some day return.

Carbon Chronicles

With journalists in Indonesia and Brazil, the stories in this project highlight how tropical forests in Costa Rica, Indonesia, and Amazonia might ameliorate—or, to the contrary, aggravate—climate change. The project also explores the current impacts of climate change on people and wildlife.

Can Catholicism Save The Amazon?

Sister Jean believes that God made us free. With that freedom, we made many terrible choices, like burning down the Amazon. Now, it is not God's job to save us -- that's up to people like Sister Jean.

Congo's Illegal Timber

In the depths of the second-largest rainforest on the planet, an Indigenous community is waging a fight against industrial giants that are destroying their ancestral forest.

High Stakes: China in the Amazon

As the world's largest consumer of soy, China's hunger drives Brazil's sales. How the Amazon fits into China's food security policy and Belt and Road Initiative—and what that means for the world.

Coca Leaf: The Green Danger of the Amazon

In Bolivia, where the Andes meets the Amazon, coca leaf is now everywhere. This plant is lucrative and so it became a monoculture in the region, causing trees to gradually vanish.

Protecting the Amazon's Isolated Tribes

Scientists explore cutting-edge technologies as indigenous communities and government agencies work to protect isolated tribes – and the forest ecosystems they depend on – in the Peruvian Amazon.

Meet the Journalist: Jesse Hyde

Jesse Hyde traveled to the Brazilian Amazon in June 2019 to report on the impact of cattle ranching on the rainforest and a series of violent conflicts over the forest's future.