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International Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund aims to support and build capacity of local, regional, and international journalists reporting on issues related to tropical rainforests. International reporting reaches audiences outside the main rainforest regions and helps create global awareness of tropical rainforest issues. International reporting on rainforest issues can show how local rainforest issues are linked to global trends, and how global events can impact local (especially Indigenous or traditional) communities and landscapes in tropical rainforests. The Rainforest Journalism Fund’s regional advisory committees provide insights on international reporting proposals, but international projects are reviewed by the Pulitzer Center.

Learn more about the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

Stairway Into Nothing (German)

When the temperatures rise in the mountains, living things have an advantage: they can climb up. But what happens when the summit is reached? This can be seen in the Peruvian Manú National Park.

Carbon Chronicles

With journalists in Indonesia and Brazil, the stories in this project highlight how tropical forests in Costa Rica, Indonesia, and Amazonia might ameliorate—or, to the contrary, aggravate—climate change. The project also explores the current impacts of climate change on people and wildlife.

Can Catholicism Save The Amazon?

Sister Jean believes that God made us free. With that freedom, we made many terrible choices, like burning down the Amazon. Now, it is not God's job to save us -- that's up to people like Sister Jean.

High Stakes: China in the Amazon

As the world's largest consumer of soy, China's hunger drives Brazil's sales. How the Amazon fits into China's food security policy and Belt and Road Initiative—and what that means for the world.

Coca Leaf: The Green Danger of the Amazon

In Bolivia, where the Andes meets the Amazon, coca leaf is now everywhere. This plant is lucrative and so it became a monoculture in the region, causing trees to gradually vanish.

Protecting the Amazon's Isolated Tribes

Scientists explore cutting-edge technologies as indigenous communities and government agencies work to protect isolated tribes – and the forest ecosystems they depend on – in the Peruvian Amazon.

These Trees Are Climate Superheroes

Tropical forests in Indonesia, Brazil, and Democratic Republic of Congo are under-appreciated superheroes regulating and rescuing the global climate. Here is the story of a few of those trees.

Can the Amazon Rainforest Be Saved?

The Amazon rainforest is at a tipping point, with wide swaths of the forest being chopped down. As the planet's most important curb against climate change, saving the forest is of global importance.

Escalator to Extinction

On a remote Peruvian mountain scientists showed that birds have moved uphill and the top ones even did extirpate. Is this the beginning of a massive retreat from the tropics because of climate change?

The Tipping Point

A wide-ranging multimedia project reported from the heart of the world's largest rainforest, as it nears a dangerous tipping point of deforestation.

Meet the Journalist: Jesse Hyde

Jesse Hyde traveled to the Brazilian Amazon in June 2019 to report on the impact of cattle ranching on the rainforest and a series of violent conflicts over the forest's future.

Meet the Journalist: Eliza Barclay

Eliza Barclay explains how the Vox reporting team focuses on key superpowers of three tree species in three rainforests to convey their unique ecological roles and the urgency of protecting the them.