Region

North America

Cries in the Night: Life in the Limbo of a Mexican Shelter

A series of Trump Administration immigration rule changes have effectively sealed the border to the vast majority of asylum seekers, leaving tens of thousands of migrants in limbo, and shifting responsibility for U.S. immigration policy to the Mexican government and dozens of Mexican shelters.

Outsourcing Migrants

The Associated Press examines what happens to asylum-seekers when Europe and the United States close their doors, outsourcing migrants to other countries.

After the Ice

The Bering Sea's winter ice has helped to sustain a remarkable abundance of sea life. For the past two years, it's been gone, and scientists are scrambling to figure out what that means for the future.

Borderland Sisterhood

In 2018, hundreds of nuns descended on the U.S.-Mexico border to volunteer in migrant shelters. Many have stayed to continue their work, citing a “calling” unlike any they have felt before.

Beyond The Border

Life after deportation: The Seattle Times explores how families—including those with American citizens—have adapted in the Mexican state of Zacatecas.

PBS NewsHour Weekend 'Future of Food' Series

Can we create a nutritious and affordable food system in a way that’s green and fair? PBS NewsHour Weekend’s "Future of Food" international series reports on work by people who think they have solutions.

Cops and Robbers

A Baltimore Sun investigation into a rogue squad of police officers who used the authority of the badge to commit crimes—and how they got away with it for so long.

Exiled Soldiers

A new report shows that hundreds of veterans were placed in deportation proceedings. We explore an unintended consequence of a 1996 immigration law that made it possible to deport veterans.

The Tree of Life

In the aftermath of the worst anti-Semitic slaughter in United States history, the neighborhood of Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, relies on a century of deep urban community to cope with trauma.

She's Not a Boy

“She’s Not a Boy” is the story of Tatenda Ngwaru, an asylum-seeking intersex woman who fled Zimbabwe with sixty dollars and the hope that she would finally find a place where she belonged.

Shrinking the Gulf Coast Dead Zones

The gradual implementation of agricultural nutrient reduction strategies across the Midwest is seen as potential solution to a loss of biodiversity in the Gulf of Mexico.

Afro-Mexican Identity

Veracruz is home to hundreds of thousands of Afro-Mexicans. In 2015, they were officially recognized in the National Census. What's happened since?

Congress Heights' Middle Schoolers Explore Journalism at USA Today

Students from Center City Public Charter School attend a three-day workshop inspired by the award-winning series ‘Pumped Dry'—learning about groundwater depletion, talking to the journalists behind the project and then tour USA Today's newsroom.

Meet the Journalist: Eli Kintisch

Eli Kintisch wrote and produced THAW, a documentary series that tells the story of a journey to the Arctic ocean in the dead of winter, revealing a radically changing ecosystem with global implications.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa McCart

Restaurateur Mike Chen legally hired expert noodle-pullers from Taiwan to create an authentic noodle house in Pittsburgh, until the Trump administration’s immigration policy changes put an end to it.

Meet the Journalist: Jaime Joyce

In the United States, one in every 28 children has a parent in jail or in prison. TIME for Kids executive editor Jaime Joyce reports on two programs that help families stay connected.

Meet the Journalist: Amy Martin

Threshold is a public radio show and podcast tackling one pressing environmental issue each season. The show aims to be a home for nuanced journalism about human relationships with the natural world.

Meet the Journalists: Texas Tribune Staff

After a new federal immigration policy led to hundreds of children being separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, The Texas Tribune opened a temporary South Texas bureau to investigate.

Meet the Journalist: Jonas Bendiksen

Photographer Jonas Bendiksen traveled to Greenland to visualize its demographic challenges: As more women than men leave to study or live abroad, there are fewer than nine women for every 10 men.

The New York Times Magazine Presents 'The 1619 Project' Onstage

“What if I told you that the year 1619 is as important to the American story as the year 1776? What if I told you that America is a country born both of an idea and a lie?” author Nikole Hannah-Jones asked during the live-streamed announcement of 'The 1619 Project,' for which the Pulitzer Center serves as the education partner, at the TimesCenter on Tuesday, August 13.

Back to School: Catching up with the World

At the start of the school year, students might want to discuss global issues that arose over the summer. This lesson is intended to spark discussion on current events and ways to keep up with them.

Activities to Extend Student Engagement

Standards-aligned activities drawing from concepts in the essays, creative texts, photographs, and illustrations to engage students in creative and challenging ways.

Future of Food

This lesson introduces the question: Can we create a nutritious and affordable food system in a way that’s green and fair?