Region

Africa

Medical Student's Life-Saving Dream Comes True

LWALA, KENYA- In 2006, NewsChannel 5 reported about a Vanderbilt University medical student who was the first person from his Kenyan village to fly in an airplane.

People back home sold their livestock to pay for his ticket to the United States.

Now they need Milton Ochieng back to save his dying village.

Every student at Vanderbilt Medical School encounters AIDS. But only Ochieng has been orphaned by it.

First his mother, then his father - he learned of their deaths through email.

"I don't think anything really prepared me for it," Ochieng said.

What does it take to get closure?

David Morse, for the Pulitzer Center

This was, for all of us, a big journey. Most blogs written from the saddle like this one just kind of stop. Though I can't provide closure for myself entirely, and expect that may be true for the others - the experience is still running through us - I feel some need to say goodbye or at least "See you later" to those who have followed our journey from afar.

Inside Ethiopia

Ethiopia's impoverished Somali region still bears evidence of the 1970s war between Somalia and Ethiopia. From Jijiga — the region's capital and closest major city to the Somali border — to Gode — a badlands town that houses numerous U.N. agencies and NGOs — the region has struggled from the ravages of flood and drought.

Med Students Keep Promise of a Clinic for Their Village in Kenya

Global health advocates are trying desperately to get your attention. They worry that statistics have lost their meaning. Who can wrap their mind around 6,500 Africans dying of AIDS every day, anyway? As the director of a global health advocacy firm in Washington told me the other day, "We need a story."

That's when I told her about Milton Ochieng'.