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Event

The Coastal Southeast: Rising and Hazardous Waters (Session Two)

Event Date:

October 22, 2020 | 2:00 PM EDT
Participants:
A properly functioning septic system has plenty of soil between the tank and the groundwater to ensure filtration. Image courtesy of UGA Carl Vinson Institute.
English

When we talk about sea-level rise, it's usually in terms of flooding: homes destroyed, roads...

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Charleston firefighter Viktor Kruzhinsky (left) uses a roof hook as a depth gauge to sound the ground in front of him while rescuing motorists trapped by floodwaters at the intersection of King and Huger streets after an intense downpour in downtown Charleston on Friday, September 25. Image by Andrew J. Whitaker / Post and Courier. United States, 2020.
Charleston firefighter Viktor Kruzhinsky (left) uses a roof hook as a depth gauge to sound the ground in front of him while rescuing motorists trapped by floodwaters at the intersection of King and Huger streets after an intense downpour in downtown Charleston on Friday, September 25. Image by Andrew J. Whitaker / Post and Courier. United States, 2020.

Will my septic system survive the floods of hurricane season? How much will it cost and who will pay to repair damage to infrastructure caused by rising tides? How safe is it to walk through floodwaters? Seasonal storms and rising sea levels are disrupting daily life for residents in the southeastern United States—demanding answers to new questions about the future. 

Join the Pulitzer Center at 2:00pm EDT on Thursday, October 22, 2020, for part two of a two-part series on the impact of climate change in the U.S. Southeast. This series will feature newsrooms and reporting projects from the Southeast contributing to our Connected Coastlines initiative.

Session Two: Hazardous Waters 

Crumbling highways and displaced homes aren't the only threats caused by floods and rising water. Newsrooms in coastal states of the Southeast have investigated what exactly is in these waters and the often invisible threats for coastal residents. 

Session Two will focus on the hazards in floodwaters and rising sea levels, and how journalists have begun tracking the impact of this displaced water. Panelists include:  

  • Tony Bartelme, reporter, The Post and Courier 
  • Emily Jones, reporter, Georgia Public Broadcasting
  • Sammy Fretwell, reporter, The Slate

Register Online for Session Two

Participants may register for one or both sessions. Visit pulitzercenter.org for further updates on panelists in this series and to learn more about Session One.

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