Tags

Systems and Safety

Where Storms Are Lore, Folks See Change

While hurricanes are woven through the history of Down East Carteret County, a remote string of communities on the central North Carolina coast known for its fishing and boatbuilding traditions, Hurricane Florence was a turning point for conversations on "sea level rise".

Neglected and Unmapped

Efforts to map Makoko, Nigeria assert the presence of the community's residents, streets, and schools after a long history of evictions. 

The Many Varieties of Voter Suppression

America’s decentralized election system fails voters in a common way. As each state adopts independent mesaures, the electoral stresses caused by COVID-19 and laws that aim to ensure the security of American elections may increase voter suppression in the country. 

Homeschooling When Home Isn't Safe

Tyra Johnson doesn't allow her kids to play outside, so they've been stuck indoors during the pandemic. Her apartment sits in Preservation Square, in 63106, the ZIP code where people live an average of 18 years fewer than those living eight miles away in Clayton.

Introducing 'Back From the Brink'

After USMC veteran Bill Kirner's father dies, things go from bad to worse. In this trailer for Back From the Brink, Bill's wife worries about having guns in the house, fearing Bill may take his own life.

Lives Frozen by Conflict

Ukraine's war has displaced more than 1.5 million with over 10,000 civilian casualties. In 2014, when the violence broke out, many young people left, while the elderly stayed behind just barely surviving. 

COVID-LA Photo Series

UC Berkeley photography student Clara Mokri captures Los Angeles life in the time of coronavirus through this series of black and white images.

Assisted Dying and Euthanasia

Assisted dying and euthanasia are part of a new approach to death that emphasises the individual's right to call time on suffering. The effects of this shift on wider society will be immense.

Noise Pollution and Power in Mumbai

In one of the planet’s loudest cities, a battle rages over noise pollution and when the sounds of a booming metropolis become a threat to public health.

The Tragedy of the "Good" Orphanage

We’ve all heard stories about abusive orphanages. But there’s a bigger problem: good orphanages. Rich countries abolished orphanages decades ago. So why do we keep them going in poor countries?

India's Rumor Busters Face Daunting Task

This project explores efforts being made across India—from government, media and tech companies—to address the issue of disinformation spreading on social media and messaging platforms.

The 2011 Japan Tsunami

From the personal to international, examining the long-term cultural impact of the 2011 Japan tsunami.

Restorative Businesses

Entrepreneurs and investors are rewriting the rules of business, challenging conventional growth principles to build an economy fueled by transparency and equality.

Detained, Deported, Deserted

New Zealanders make up the largest group of people inside Australian detention centers, and hundreds have been deported in recent years—an issue that’s causing mounting social and political tensions.

Far from Over

Tools are now available to prevent and treat HIV infections, but Russia, Nigeria and the U.S. state of Florida each are struggling, for different reasons, to fully exploit the power of these tools.

Yemen: A Weary Nation

Three years into the civil and international war, Yemen's health systems are failing. This project will show the variety of health challenges facing Yemenis: trauma, cholera, chronic, and shortage.

Criminal Justice Challenges

Two reports on criminal justice: a look at efforts to keep the mentally ill out of jail and an examination of the struggle to provide the poor with public defenders.

What Went Wrong? Citizen Reports of Foreign Aid in Kenya

The effectiveness of foreign aid is hotly debated, but the voices of aid recipients are often missing from the conversation. This project gathered reports from citizens using mobile phone surveys and then investigated their claims.

This Week: Jailing the Mentally Ill

This Week: What happens when people with mental illness go to jail, the Pulitzer Center enters its second year as a media partner for the Catchlight Fellowship, and students are invited to submit poetry about peace and conflict.

This Week: Contagion That Travels by Plane

This week: How poor hygiene on planes leads to the spread of dangerous communicable diseases, how Sámi people are caught between a climate change solution and their own livelihoods, and how you can double your holiday gift to the Pulitzer Center.