Tags

Systems and Safety

Chicago's Pandemic Recovery Process

Peter Slevin, who teaches at Campus Consortium partner Medill School of Journalism, writes for The New Yorker about the "perilous next phase" of Chicago's recovery from the coronavirus.

Mexico City's Deepening Water Crisis

As an increasingly severe water crisis grips Mexico City, what will the future look like in a world that is rapidly running out of usable water?

Can Women Stand Their Ground?

This story examines how the criminal justice system is not equipped to protect women who protect themselves. It is told through the lens of one case—the Alabama murder trial of Brittany Smith.

Broken Justice

Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.

Renovating Villa 31

Forty thousand people live in substandard conditions in downtown Buenos Aires' Villa 31. With property deeds and infrastructure upgrades, can authorities finally resolve the eyesore on their front doorstep?

He Did the Crime, She Did the Time

Reporter Allison Herrera explores a law in Oklahoma called "Failure to Protect," meant to decrease the number of abused children. Sometimes, it's the woman and not the abuser who does more time.

Pastor Battles Inequality in Haiti

In Port au Prince, Pastor Julio Volcy believes that to build a better Haiti, he must first build stronger Christians, preparing them to withstand poverty and oppression by living lives of integrity.

Beedi Workers in India

Despite difficult living conditions, 4.5 million women in India pursue rolling beedis (hand-rolled cigarettes) to earn their livelihood. The identities of 89 percent of beedi workers fade along with their fingerprints.

Haiti Earthquake: Ten Years Later

On Jan. 12, 2010, Haiti suffered its most devastating disaster. More than 300,000 souls were lost, 1.5 million people were injured and an equal number made homeless. What has happened since?

Discharged: The Missed Cases of Sex Trafficking

For years, the U.S. healthcare system has failed to identify sex-trafficked victims in clinics and hospitals across the country, but a new coalition of doctors and activists seeks to change this.

Meet the Journalist: Nsikan Akpan

The placebo effect influences all types of healing, from acupuncture to laying of hands to the doctor's office. Science producer for PBS NewsHour Nsikan Akpan journeyed from Mexico to Maryland to learn how it works.

Meet the Journalist: John Yang

Pulitzer Center grantees John Yang and Frank Carlson investigate the imprisonment of mentally ill Americans, efforts to seek alternative treatments, and the struggle to provide the poor with public defenders.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson and photojournalist Mark Hoffman traveled to Brazil, Kenya, and Uganda to report on the threat of zoonotic diseases long associated with poverty.

 

Meet the Journalist: T.R. Goldman

What does it take for a developing country like Nigeria to roll out a new healthcare protocol for newborns on a national scale? T.R. Goldman discusses the challenges this country faces.

Meet the Journalist: Neil Brandvold

Photojournalist Neil Brandvold investigates the paralytic disease Konzo that has inflicted polio-life symptoms on thousands of the most impoverished people in Democratic Republic of Congo.

Meet the Journalist: Sonia Shah

Tens of thousands of people fleeing bombs and beheadings are trapped in squalid refugee camps and ad hoc settlements across Greece. Will the country's tattered health system be able to prevent an epidemic?

IWMF Awards to 2 Pulitzer Center Student Fellow Alums

Student fellow alum Pat Nabong from the Medill School of Journalism was named a Gwen Ifill Fellow by the International Women's Media Foundation (IWMF), while Neeta Satam, student fellow alum from the Missouri School of Journalism was awarded an IWMF Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice in the Americas grant.

Resources for World Health Day 2019

April 7 is World Health Day, focusing this year on universal health coverage. If you want to help students understand the health crises facing their communities and the world as a whole, we have resources for you.

Pedestrian Safety

Students investigate educational resources about the safety of pedestrians in developing countries and design mock letters to politicians in charge of roads in a developing country.

Roads Kill: The Dangers of Motorcycles

In the following lesson, students will analyze several resources about the dangers of motorcycles, and by the end, they will write a summary about the dangers of motorcycles.

News Bite 3: Too Young to Die

In this lesson, we'll take a look at a short film trailer and a photograph by Carlos Javier Ortiz around the issue of gun violence in Chicago, exploring its often-untold consequences.