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Amazon Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund aims to support and build capacity of local, regional, and international journalists reporting on issues related to tropical rainforests. One of the three rainforest regions of focus is the Amazon Basin, spanning across the continent of South America. The Amazon RJF advisory committee is composed of leaders in journalism on issues relating to tropical rainforests. Founding members of this committee were the first to envision a fund to support rainforest journalism in the Amazon in a way that is informed by regional perspectives and deep understanding of the context. This vision served as inspiration for the further elaboration of the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

Members of the Amazon RJF advisory committee review and provide independent guidance for proposals for local and regional reporting projects focusing on tropical rainforests in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. The committee also helps to develop annual convenings for journalists reporting from and on the Amazon Basin.

To learn about the first annual RJF convening in the Amazon region, please visit our update. Eliane Brum’s speech, “Why the Amazon is the Center of the World” is available in here in Portuguese and English.

 

To contact Jan Rocha, the Amazon Regional Coordinator, please email amazon.rjf@pulitzercenter.org.

To contact Nora Moraga-Lewy, the RJF Coordinator, please email nmoragalewy@pulitzercenter.org

Learn more about the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

Amazon ‘Retakings’ Challenge Bolsonaro

Some indigenous communities are pushing back against the Bolsonaro government by carrying out occupations, known as “retomadas,” of traditional lands that they say the government has been too slow to recognize as rightfully theirs.

The Wampis: First Indigenous Autonomous Government in Peru Fights Back Against Deforestation (Spanish)

The Wampis Nation is made up of thousands of people whose ancestors have lived in the Amazon rainforest in the north of Peru for centuries. Increasing raids from loggers, miners, and those searching for fossil fuels, in addition to political changes that favor industrial exploitation of natural resources, have left the Wampis more and more worried about the future of their home.

The Sateré-Mawé Retake Ancestral Land Threatened by Loggers and Land Thieves (Portuguese)

In a region historically occupied by the Sateré-Mawé people, the Indians are demanding that the National Indigenous Agency (Funai) correct the boundaries of the Indigenous Andirá-Marau land. A Mongabay reporting team, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund and the Pulitzer Center, accompanied their trip to regions which will become future villages.

Joane: Plastic Is Killing Us in the Amazon

This young Brazilian activist fights for a better future in her village in the Brazilian Amazon. Her story is the fourth in the series 'Rainforest Defenders' which presents five activists fighting against environmental destruction and Bolsonaro's government.

Amazon on Fire

By land and air, a photo essay that shows fire in the heart of the Amazon.

Back to School: Catching up with the World

At the start of the school year, students might want to discuss global issues that arose over the summer. This lesson is intended to spark discussion on current events and ways to keep up with them.