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Amazon Rainforest Journalism Fund

The Rainforest Journalism Fund aims to support and build capacity of local, regional, and international journalists reporting on issues related to tropical rainforests. One of the three rainforest regions of focus is the Amazon Basin, spanning across the continent of South America. The Amazon RJF advisory committee is composed of leaders in journalism on issues relating to tropical rainforests. Founding members of this committee were the first to envision a fund to support rainforest journalism in the Amazon in a way that is informed by regional perspectives and deep understanding of the context. This vision served as inspiration for the further elaboration of the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

Members of the Amazon RJF advisory committee review and provide independent guidance for proposals for local and regional reporting projects focusing on tropical rainforests in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. The committee also helps to develop annual convenings for journalists reporting from and on the Amazon Basin. Current members of the Amazon RJF Advisory Committee are:

To learn about the first annual RJF convening in the Amazon region, please visit our update. Eliane Brum’s speech, “Why the Amazon is the Center of the World” is available in here in Portuguese and English.

To contact Jan Rocha, the Amazon Regional Coordinator, please email amazon.rjf@pulitzercenter.org.

To contact Nora Moraga-Lewy, the RJF Coordinator, please email nmoragalewy@pulitzercenter.org

Learn more about the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

The Sateré-Mawé Retake Ancestral Land Threatened by Loggers and Land Thieves (Portuguese)

In a region historically occupied by the Sateré-Mawé people, the Indians are demanding that the National Indigenous Agency (Funai) correct the boundaries of the Indigenous Andirá-Marau land. A Mongabay reporting team, supported by the Rainforest Journalism Fund and the Pulitzer Center, accompanied their trip to regions which will become future villages.

Joane: Plastic Is Killing Us in the Amazon

This young Brazilian activist fights for a better future in her village in the Brazilian Amazon. Her story is the fourth in the series 'Rainforest Defenders' which presents five activists fighting against environmental destruction and Bolsonaro's government.

Tupí: A Story of Indigenous Courage and Resolve

As part of our series 'Rainforest Defenders,' we present the stories of five activists fighting to save the Amazon in Brazil. "Tupí," our last chapter, is an indigenous activist fighting to protect human rights in her region.

Tupí: A Story of Courage and Determination (Spanish)

A young woman from the Amazon found strength to overcome a past of sexual, physical, and psychological abuse by turning to her roots and heritage. Her story is the fifth and final in the series "Rainforest Defenders," which highlights young leaders who are fighting to protect the forest.

Drica: Resistance in the Quilombos of the Trombetas River

A young Brazilian activist is responsible for an association of six afro-Brazilian communities that face the threat of environmental destruction. Her story is the third in the "Rainforest Defenders" series, presenting five young leaders fighting to preserve the Brazilian Amazon rainforest.

A Life Fighting Against Hydroelectricity

Indigenous people from the south of the Brazilian rainforest have mobilized to prevent 138 hydroelectricity plants from invading the Juruena river basin.

Juruena Resists: A Historic Battle for a River (Portuguese)

Jair Bolsonaro's government's policies threaten Indigenous communities in the Juruena Basin region of Mato Grosso, Brazil. For over three decades, communities have been struggling to bar the construction of large hydroelectric dams, which affect their territories and ways of life.

A Life Against Dams (Spanish)

Indigenous peoples and ribereños in the southern Brazilian Amazon are mobilizing to prevent the invasion of more than 138 hydroelectric structures in the Juruena River watershed that would exacerbate deforestation metrics throughout the region.

Reclaiming Land for Survival

Gamella Indians of Maranhão reclaim their ancestral lands from the hands of landowners and regenerate Amazonian flora and fauna.