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Story Publication logo July 3, 2012

Death and Love: The Poetry of Afghanistan's Women

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Anonymous and spoken, landai , two-line Pashtun poems, have served for centuries as a means of self...

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Over 300 members of Mirman Baheer, the Ladies Literary Society, stretch across the provinces of Afghanistan. Women write and recite landai, two-line folk poems that can be funny, sexy, raging or tragic and have traditionally dealt with love and grief. For many women, these poems allow them to express themselves free of social constraints and obligations. Five out of 100 women in Afghanistan graduate from high school; most are married by the age of 16. This kind of expression is looked down upon in society, forcing the women writing to keep their craft a secret.

Meetings of the poetry society are held in Kabul, but with 8 out of 10 Afghanistan women residing in rural areas, many women call in to the meetings. Zarmina Shehadi was one of those callers. She lit herself on fire two years ago. Her family denies her suicide, claiming that she lit herself on fire to get warm after a bath. "She was a good girl, an uneducated girl. Our girls don't want to go to school," her mother said. Zarmina is the most recent of Afghanistan's poet-martyrs.

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