Publications

PBS NewsHour

How a New Grain Could Help Combat Climate Change

Scientists in Minnesota and Kansas are developing a grain called Kernza, which, unlike most of our food crops, is a perennial plant with a whole host of environmental benefits.

Broken Justice, Episode 2: How Did We Get Here?

Americans didn't always have the right to an attorney. It all started with a pool hall robbery in Florida, and a drifter named Clarence Earl Gideon.

Broken Justice, Episode 1: 'Triage'

Can an attorney handle more than 100 criminal cases at a time? That's the reality for a public defender like Jeff Esparza, who represents defendants unable to afford their own lawyers in Kansas City.

Can Sustainable Farming Save Iowa’s Precious Soil and Water?

Iowa is a powerhouse producer of corn and soybeans. But all the industrial farming has come at a cost to the environment. Today, there's a growing number of farmers adopting more sustainable practices in a bid to save Iowa's precious soil and water.

Why China’s Art Market Is Evolving From Knockoffs to New Works

In the past, China was better known for producing 75 percent of the world’s art knockoffs than for its own creative innovation. Today, that is changing, as Chinese artists are reviving what they call the country’s “cultural aristocracy” by producing original art.

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How China’s High-Tech ‘Eyes’ Monitor Behavior and Dissent

Technology is transforming China, helping improve life in some ways, but also collecting big data. The government is beginning to convert that data and surveillance footage into social credit scores, which critics say can be used to penalize those who criticize the Communist Party. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.