Country

Ecuador

The Andes’ Melting Glaciers

The Andes' glaciers are rapidly melting as global temperatures continue to rise. Climate change has already taken a heavy toll on the glaciers of Antisana, Ecuador’s fourth highest mountain.

Ecuador: Antisana's Vanishing Glaciers

Climate change may affect not only the ice cap on Antisana, but also the páramo, the spongy grassland that surrounds it—and provides Quito, Ecuador's capital, with one-third of its water.

Bushmeat Market and Degradation of the Ecuadorian Rainforest

The rise of commercial hunting in Ecuador is disrupting the balance of the Ecuadorian ecosystem.

A recent report estimated that 12 tons of bushmeat is sold every year at the Pompeya market and most of the bushmeat is being hunted by the native Huaorani.

Nearly 50 species of animals are traded each year in the markets and the impact of the large scale poaching is causing problems for the environment. The hunting of large mammals is impacting seed dispersal and allowing for less control on the growth of smaller seed-eating rodents.

Ecuador Puts a Price Tag on Untapped Oil

Whether they’ve looked at the trees, the insects, or the jaguars, scientists have agreed that Yasuní National Park in Ecuador’s Amazonian rain forest is one of the most diverse places on earth. But nature left one thing underground that could seal the fate of all that life above: Nearly one billion barrels of oil.

Ecuador's Oil Demons

The Deepwater Horizon accident reminds us that oil drilling is dirty business.

Ecuadorans know this fact. They’ve lived off, and with, oil for more than three decades. For many Ecuadorans, oil promised riches but delivered ruin. Along with great wealth, for a few, it stimulated political vice and the noxious excretions.

Fishing story: Four Friends in Ecuador's Rain Forest

Tiputini Research Site, Ecuador--Do the world's tribes enjoy any pastimes in common? Probably not. But one lazy afternoon, four guys raised far from one another delighted in a mutual passion in the forest of the Amazon basin of eastern Ecuador, giving renewed hope of cross cultural harmony.

The New Law of the Jungle

Chevron is accused of having dumped 18 billion gallons of toxic waste in Ecuador’s Amazonian rainforest, and local residents are determined to hold them accountable.

Oil and Justice in the Amazon

Pulitzer Center grantee Kelly Hearn talks to NPR On Point about the historic environmental lawsuit filed by indigenous people of Ecuador's Amazonian rainforest against U.S.-based oil company Chevron.

Drug Cartels Siphon Pipelines

Colombian cocaine cartels are tapping into pipelines in Ecuador, stealing thousands of gallons a day of "white gas" that can be used to process raw coca into cocaine.