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Pulitzer Center Update March 21, 2019

Pulitzer Center Grantees Receive 2019 Overseas Press Club Awards and Citations

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Japan has the largest percentage of elderly people in the world, with 27.3 percent of its citizens...

Image courtesy of Overseas Press Club.

On March 20, 2019, the Overseas Press Club of America announced the winners of its 80th Annual Awards. Three Pulitzer Center projects received awards, and two were honored with citations. 

Nariman El-Mofty was awarded the Olivier Rebbot Award for best photographic news reporting from abroad for the project "Yemen: On The Edge." Published by the Associated Press with support from the Pulitzer Center, this project investigated a range of issues related to Yemen's civil war, including the Houthis' use of child soldiers, the lack of humanitarian aid in the country, and the experiences of prisoners of war. The judges "saw several strong portfolios from Yemen—a country that, until last year, had been severely neglected by mainstream media coverage. Nariman El-Mofty's work stood out."

Shiho Fukada received the Feature Photography Award for best feature photography on an international theme for her Pulitzer Center-supported project, "For Many of Japan's Elderly Women, Prison Is a Haven." Published in Bloomberg Businessweek, Fukada's reporting covered rising crime rates among elderly Japanese women who seek the community and stability offered by the prison system. The judges stated that the photos were "a humanizing point of entry into…conversations about aging, about loneliness, about society's role in caring for its elderly."

Jeffrey E. Stern received the Joe and Laurie Dine Award for best international reporting in any medium dealing with human rights for his project, "From Arizona to Yemen: The Journey of an American Bomb." Published in The New York Times Magazine with support from the Pulitzer Center, Stern's meticulous reporting traced the path of bombs made in the United States, their adoption by the Saudi armed forces, and how they change lives on the ground in Yemen after they are deployed. The judges praised Stern's "calm sense of moral outrage, [showing] us how the US government and businesses have blood on their hands."

Maggie Michael, Maad al-Zikry, and Nariman El-Mofty were runners-up for two awards for their Pulitzer Center-supported coverage of Yemen's civil war for the Associated Press, receiving citations for the Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper, news service or digital reporting from abroad and the Roy Rowan Award for best investigative reporting in any medium on an international story.

Amy Martin and the team at the Threshold podcast received a citation for the Lowell Thomas Award for best radio, audio, or podcast coverage of international affairs for their Pulitzer Center-supported second season focusing on climate change in the Arctic. 

The Overseas Press Club is an international association of journalists based in New York City working to encourage the highest standards in journalism, to educate the next generation of foreign correspondents, and to promote international press freedom and the well-being of colleagues in the field. The OPC Awards recognize the finest international reporting in 21 categories. The full slate of winners will be honored on April 18, 2019, at a dinner in New York.

The lists of winners and citations are available on the Overseas Press Club of America website.

Image by Jeffery E. Stern. Yemen, 2018.
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Judgment Day

"Judgment Day" brings readers inside a remote village subjected to a brutal day-long aerial attack...

Hospital in al-Khoukha, Yemen. Image by Nariman El-Mofty. Yemen, 2018.
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War has raged in Yemen since 2015, when a Saudi-led coalition waged an all-out air campaign against...

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Multiple Authors
Winfred Obruk points to the lost beach in Shishmaref, Alaska, where the community's playground and fish-drying racks are now under water. The island faces rapid erosion due to the effects of climate change, and residents have voted twice to relocate. They are determined to move as a community, but while they try to navigate this costly and complicated process, the Chukchi Sea pushes ever-closer to their homes." Image by Nick Mott. United States, 2017.
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Cold Comfort

A lot of reporting from the Arctic starts with ice and polar bears. On season two of Threshold, we...

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Multiple Authors

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