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Conflict

Conflict takes many forms, from disagreements between different political parties to indigenous communities battling government and corporate interests to full-blown warfare. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Conflict” feature reporting that covers adversarial politics, war and peace. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on conflict.

 

Highway Through Hell

The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

Flying into Iraqi Kurdistan

Lieutenant Kochar Saleh Haji, of the Kurdish peshmerga, returned to Dohuk from New York after accepting the UNESCO Global Hope Coalition award, given to ten “everyday heroes.”

Censorship or Death: Russia's War Against a Free Press in the Caucasus

Since 1993, more than 35 journalists in Russia have been murdered for their work, of these some 14 were killed in Chechnya, the North Caucasus region or in St. Petersburg. About 19 journalists have been assassinated in retaliation for their reporting since Vladimir Putin came to power (including three in 2009).

Ninth Grade Students Learn from a Crisis Reporter

Students in the 9th grade have spent the semester working on action projects built around international crises such as the quake in Haiti and the war in Afghanistan. They have been spearheading plans that range from raising money for schools to establishing pen pals in distressed countries. On Monday, May 3, the 9th grade students attended a presentation by and discussion with Jason Motlagh, a reporter who has spent the last several years writing from Afghanistan. He also represented the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, with whom the students have been working.

Elliott Woods' "Hope's Coffin" wins citation from The Overseas Press Club of America

The Overseas Press Club of America gave a citation to Elliott Woods' piece for the Virginia Quarterly Review "Hope's Coffin." He was cited for the The Madeline Dane Ross Award, which awards the best international reporting in the print medium showing a concern for the human condition. The award itself went to Abigail Haworth, "Forced to be Fat," Marie Claire.

Read an excerpt of the announcement below:

Jason Motlagh interviewed by Kent State online newspaper

Jason Motlagh has only been out of college for six years, but he has already made a successful career for himself as a freelance journalist.

After graduating from college in 2004, he got a job as a fisherman on a commercial fishing boat in Alaska.

“I was looking forward to doing something more concrete after being in college and doing a lot of abstract stuff,” Motlagh said.

Jason Motlagh Wins National Magazine Award for Digital Media

The Virginia Quarterly Review was awarded the National Magazine Award for Digital Media in the News Reporting category for Jason Motlagh's, "Sixty Hours of Terror" a four-part series covering the November 2008 Mumbai attacks.

The National Magazine Awards (known as the "Ellies") are presented by the American Society of Magazine Editors and the Journalism School at Columbia University. This is their first year to honor achievements in digital media.

Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan 2007-2009

Mark Stanley, Pulitzer Center

Recently, the Pulitzer Center has highlighted reporting projects that focus on the human factor of the conflict in Afghanistan. An ongoing issue is so-called collateral damage, the unintended civilian casualties that result from military attacks and that have often inflamed local opposition.