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Why China’s Art Market Is Evolving From Knockoffs to New Works

In the past, China was better known for producing 75 percent of the world’s art knockoffs than for its own creative innovation. Today, that is changing, as Chinese artists are reviving what they call the country’s “cultural aristocracy” by producing original art.

Chinese Tech Makes Cities ‘Smart,’ but Critics Say It Spreads Authoritarianism

Chinese 5G technology is designed to transmit huge amounts of data instantly, and deploy vast networks of surveillance cameras and facial recognition software. While dozens of countries around the world plan to adopt the innovation, human rights advocates and the U.S. are sounding the alarm. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

How China’s High-Tech ‘Eyes’ Monitor Behavior and Dissent

Technology is transforming China, helping improve life in some ways, but also collecting big data. The government is beginning to convert that data and surveillance footage into social credit scores, which critics say can be used to penalize those who criticize the Communist Party. Nick Schifrin reports as part of "China: Power and Prosperity," with support from the Pulitzer Center.

The Thin Red Line

Despite sharp international criticism, a Russian geneticist is pushing forward a project to edit embryos of a deaf couple so their children won't inherit the mutation that impairs their hearing.

China: Power and Prosperity

PBS NewsHour has produced one of the most robust efforts about China by any American television program, covering everything from Belt and Road to the trade and technology wars to Xi Jinping to green vehicles.

Dairyland in Distress

Dairy farms—Wisconsin's economic engines—have been decimated in recent years due to decreased demand, lack of workers, and slumping milk prices.

The Chinese CRISPR Revolution

China has aggressively embraced CRISPR, a powerful new genome editing tool that's transforming the discovery of improved crops and medicines—and raises thorny ethical, regulatory, and legal issues.

Basketball in Tibet

On the Tibetan plateau, an unlikely group of nomads, Buddhist monks, and yak-wool artisans have seen their lives change—through basketball. Can they also help change Tibet?

China's Footprint in Pakistan

Will China's investment in Pakistan deliver the broad-based growth, prosperity, and jobs it promises? How will it reshape local politics, infrastructure, and the environment?

Down from the Mountains

Three children in a remote corner of China are among millions getting by while their parents work far away in wealthier cities.

Macau: Portuguese Culture in Retreat?

Macau used to be known as the Portugal of Asia. Now, fewer than 1 percent of households speak Portuguese as their primary language. Can this trend change directions?

Meet the Journalist: Sim Chi Yin

Photographer Sim Chi Yin speaks on the thinking and impulse behind making the latest chapter of her ongoing project "Shifting Sands," a visual investigation of the global depletion of construction sand.

Meet the Journalist: Daniel Brook

Daniel Brook reports on the building of instant, modern cities in the developing world and examines the effects of major infrastructure projects on citizens living in Mexico, China, and India.

Meet the Journalist: Max Duncan

Filmmaker and video journalist Max Duncan introduces his project about a family from a remote corner of China. The parents left their children behind in order to give them a better future.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

Meet the Journalist: Sharron Lovell

Like so many of Mao’s pronouncements, it sounded simple: “The South has a lot of water; the North lacks water. So if it can be done, borrowing a little water and bringing it up might do the trick.”

Meet the Journalist: Sim Chi Yin

Photojournalist Sim Chi Yin discusses her reporting on a family affected by silicosis, an occupational lung disease that affects an estimated 6 million in China, most of them miners.

This Week: Kingdom of Women

This Week: A village in China where women rule, an island off British Columbia was supposed to be an economic salvation, and illegal mining is causing problems for Venezuela.

This Week: Seeking Answers for Iran’s Chemical Weapons Survivors

This week: Scientists investigate the long term effects of chemical warfare on Iranian soldiers, a look into how artistic integrity is maintained inside the Chinese Communist system, and more than 100 people are suing Guam's Catholic Church over accusations of sexual abuse by priests.

10 Lesson Plans to Celebrate Earth Day

In celebration of Earth Day, we've compiled our top ten lesson plans that feature reporting on how communities around the world are responding to diverse environmental issues.

Exotic Pets and Impacts on the Food Chain

Students will be able to describe the impacts of removing exotic animals from their native environment, including impacts on the food chain, using details from reporting by Sean Gallagher. Within...

Is There Really Religious Conflict?

This lesson challenges students to take a position related to what is causing or fueling conflicts that could be labeled religious. Students create an argumentative research paper and presentation.

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