Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Bombs to Coffee

In this coffee shop, former militants learn how to make coffee instead of bombs. They also learn acceptance by serving and interacting with others from diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds.

Georgia: Day of Dogs

When families flee conflict, they are forced to choose what to bring and what to leave behind. Tomik the dog refused to stay.

 

'Treasonous' Young Kurds and a Referendum

Iraqi Kurdistan wants to split from Iraq's central government. But a group of young Kurds have joined controversial Baghdad-backed militias of Iraq. They provide a unique window on where the country may be heading.

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

Syria: The Next Chapter

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the wider Middle East?

Inside Jordan: Life after the Syrian War

Jordanian Identity is as ambiguous as it is rapidly evolving. After decades of championing coexistence, Jordanian identity remains an elusive social and political phenomenon.

Russia's Real Foreign Policy

What does Russia really want and how does it get it? A look at Russian foreign policy—from agenda to implementation—in Europe and the Middle East.

Meet the Journalist: Alia Malek

One hundred years after the Armenian genocide in Turkey, Alia Malek examines how sectarian allegiances are erasing history as she explores the fate of those living in Turkey, Syria, and Armenia.

WithDraw: Meet George Butler

Reportage illustrator George Butler provides a first-hand impression of how things are developing in Afghanistan—and how life continues despite the uncertainty of the country's situation.

This Week: Losing Earth

This week: the decade we almost stopped climate change, the U.S.-backed coalition in Yemen is paying Al-Qaeda militants, and Magnum photographers journey through six countries where indigenous people are fighting to keep the rights to their land.

Related Events