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Pulitzer Center Update July 31, 2018

This Week: Escaping Al-Shabab

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Mohamed Hussein (not his real name) runs a rehabilitation center in a small town near Mogadishu. The center helps young men rebuild their lives after defecting from the terrorist group Al-Shabab. Image by Hassan Santur. Somalia, 2018.
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For over a decade, the terrorist group Al-Shabab has been waging a campaign of violence and terror...

Ugandan soldiers serving with the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) 33rd Battalion walk between defensive positions along the frontline in Yaaqshiid District of Mogadishu, where AMISOM forces have pushed Al Shabaab militants beyond the city's northern fringes to the outskirts of the Somali capital. AU/UN Image by Stuart Price. Somalia, 2011. (CC0 1.0).
Ugandan soldiers serving with the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) 33rd Battalion walk between defensive positions along the frontline in Yaaqshiid District of Mogadishu, where AMISOM forces have pushed Al Shabaab militants beyond the city's northern fringes to the outskirts of the Somali capital. AU/UN Image by Stuart Price. Somalia, 2011. (CC0 1.0).

Escaping Al Shabab
Hassan Ghedi Santur

Over the years, thousands of Somali children have fallen into the clutches of the Somali terror group al-Shabab. Some have been groomed in Quranic schools, others have been forcibly recruited. Now, with al-Shabab losing support, many of these underage militants want to defect. Writing for Yahoo News, Pitching for Peace finalist Hassan Ghedi Santur tells the story of one boy who joined the terror group at the age of seven and had taken part in several attacks by the time he was nine. He later managed to escape. Now 16, he must overcome a world of suspicion and hostility in order to rebuild his life.

Image by George Steinmetz. Antarctica, 2018.
Image by George Steinmetz. Antarctica, 2018.

Why U.S. Lawmakers Failed to Act on Climate Change Decades Ago
Nathaniel Rich and Hari Sreenivasan

On August 5, The New York Times Magazine will devote its entire publication to the issue of climate change, with reporting by Nathaniel Rich and photography by George Steinmetz. Rich joins PBS NewsHour's Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the project; it launches Wednesday with a panel discussion at The New York Times Center. Watch the teaser here.

Oriol Mitjà, whose work has triggered a new yaws eradication effort, examines a young patient named Jeremiah, who has an active infection, but can be cured with a dose of azithromycin. Image by Brian Cassey. Papua New Guinea, 2018. 
Oriol Mitjà, whose work has triggered a new yaws eradication effort, examines a young patient named Jeremiah, who has an active infection, but can be cured with a dose of azithromycin. Image by Brian Cassey. Papua New Guinea, 2018. 

One Man's Quest to Defeat a Disease
Martin Enserink and Brian Cassey

Yaws, a tropical skin disease that affects millions of people, can cause lifelong pain and disability. Martin Enserlink reports for Science Magazine on a Spanish physician-scientist who may have found a way to eradicate it.

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Losing Earth

The decade from 1979 to 1989 was a critical one for climate action. At the start of this 10-year...

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Multiple Authors
Bacteria from yaws ulcers can infect another person when they enter through wounds or scratches. Image by Brian Cassey. Papua New Guinea, 2018. 
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When Oriol Mitjà came to Papua New Guinea's Lihir Island in 2010 at age 29, he intended to stay for...

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Multiple Authors

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