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Story Publication logo January 17, 2021

12 Portraits of Biodiversity in Pekalongan Tropical Rainforest (bahasa Indonesia)

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A population of rare ornamental birds called the Gray Bentet (Lanius schach), commonly known as Cendet, still exists in the Petungkriyono Forest. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
A population of rare ornamental birds called the Gray Bentet (Lanius schach), commonly known as Cendet, still exists in the Petungkriyono Forest. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.

Pekalongan, IDN Times - The Petungkriyono tropical rainforest is part of the Dieng Mountains and is administratively located in Pekalongan Regency, Central Java, with an altitude of about 500-1,700 meters above sea level (masl).

The forest, which is managed under the Forest Management Unit (KPH) of Perum Perhutani East Pekalongan through the Doro Forest Management Unit (BKPH), is the only remaining tropical rain forest in Java Island today. Based on Perhutani's data as of November 2020, the Petungkriyono forest area reached 5,847.29 hectares.

Biodiversity in the forest is still maintained even though it falls outside the designated conservation area. Petungkriyono forest ecology provides benefits not only for the surrounding flora and fauna, but also for humans and the environment.

IDN Times specifically captures a number of flora and fauna in the forest in 12 portraits.

A rare and protected animal, the Javan Eagle (Nisaetus bartelsi) is a sign that other species in its food chain are still preserved in the forest.
A rare and protected animal, the Javan Eagle (Nisaetus bartelsi) is a sign that other species in its food chain are still preserved in the forest. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020
Petungkriyono Forest, located in the lowlands, also serves as the habitat for the Golden Hornbill (Aceros undulatus).
Petungkriyono Forest, located in the lowlands, also serves as the habitat for the Golden Hornbill (Aceros undulatus). Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
A number of rare and protected primates also exist in the forest, like the Long Tailed Monkey (Macaca fascicularis).
A number of rare and protected primates also exist in the forest, like the Long Tailed Monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
In the tropical rainforest there are Javanese Surili, known in the local language as Rekrekan (Presbytis comata). The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) placed the species in the Endangered (EN) category because its population continues to decline.
In the tropical rainforest there are Javanese Surili, known in the local language as Rekrekan (Presbytis comata). The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) placed the species in the Endangered (EN) category because its population continues to decline. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
There are around 3,000 Javan langur monkeys (Trachypithecus auratus) in Petungkriyono Forest.
There are around 3,000 Javan langur monkeys (Trachypithecus auratus) in Petungkriyono Forest. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
12 Potret Keanekaragaman Hayati di Hutan Hujan Tropis Pekalongan
The Javan gibbon (Hylobates moloch) is also included in the Endangered (E) designation by IUCN. It also occupied the status of Critically Endangered (CR) or critical in 1996 and 2000. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
12 Potret Keanekaragaman Hayati di Hutan Hujan Tropis Pekalongan
The appearance of many dragonflies in the morning, such as the Euphaea variegata species, is a sign that the air in the forest is still clean and healthy. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
12 Potret Keanekaragaman Hayati di Hutan Hujan Tropis Pekalongan
There are also spiders that play a role in controlling the population of insects and other invertebrates so that the ecosystem in the forest remains stable. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
12 Potret Keanekaragaman Hayati di Hutan Hujan Tropis Pekalongan
Apart from animals, there are also epiphyte, terrestrial, fern, and tree species that are able to support water management and soil fertility, like pole ferns (Cyathea contaminans). Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
12 Potret Keanekaragaman Hayati di Hutan Hujan Tropis Pekalongan
Liana plants grow around trees, using them as a support to get sunlight. Lianas are not parasitic plants. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.
12 Potret Keanekaragaman Hayati di Hutan Hujan Tropis Pekalongan
Decorative flowers like the Impatiens flaccida also grow naturally and are widely available in Petungkriyono Forest. Image by Dhana Kencana/IDN Times. Indonesia, 2020.

In addition to its preserved biodiversity, the climate in the Pekalongan Tropical Rainforest is also stable. The climate remains cool at micro and macro levels amidst massive climate change. Rainfall and humidity are also relatively high, with rainfall intensity reaching 34.8 millimeters per day.

The local village community has a major role in protecting the forest and everything in it because its sustainability is important for their lives. Among other things, water preservation and sustainable forest tree density can anticipate hydrometeorological disasters, such as erosion and flooding. So what are you waiting for, save the forest!

This story was supported by the Pulitzer Center through the Rainforest Journalism Fund.

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