Projects

Launched May 5, 2015 Chris Kraul
Nicaragua says a $50 billion interoceanic canal would give the country the economic boost it needs to escape grinding poverty. But environmentalists and scientists say the project is poorly planned.
Launched May 5, 2015 Jonathan M. Katz, Allison Shelley
Bill and Hillary Clinton have wielded extraordinary influence in Haiti for decades, and particularly since the 2010 earthquake.
Launched April 30, 2015 Elizabeth Dickinson
Saudi Arabia's King Salman has been on the throne since January 2015, but already has signaled important shifts in the country’s internal governance and foreign policy.
Launched April 27, 2015 Julia Simon
In Nigeria, great fortunes often point back to the highest offices of government.
Launched April 27, 2015 Bridget Huber
Surgically-treatable conditions cause more death and disability than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, combined. Now, a group of doctors is pushing to put surgery on the global health agenda.
Launched April 14, 2015 Chris Arsenault
In 2009, Libya bought 100,000 hectares of prime territory in Mali in what critics consider a "land grab". With both countries facing instability: who controls the farm land now?
Launched April 13, 2015 Beth Gardiner
Poland gets 90 percent of its power and much of its heat by burning coal, one of the dirtiest of fuels. The consequences for Poles' health are severe, and one polluted city is now pushing back
Launched April 9, 2015 Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, Michael G. Seamans
Forced to choose between corrupt government clinics and faith healers, Sierra Leone's pregnant women and their infants are dying in record numbers. One doctor may have the solution.
Launched April 9, 2015 Tik Root, Juan Herrero
More than twenty years after a genocide, a look at the next generation of Rwandans and their place in a rapidly changing country.
Launched April 8, 2015 M. Sophia Newman
There's a method to stopping gun violence before it starts--and it has worked in seven countries. Can the method be modified to prevent sexual violence?
Launched April 7, 2015 Cameron Conaway
India has declared 2015-2016 as Jal Kranti Varsh, or Water Revolution Year. What will this mean for the Ganges, the country’s most sacred and notoriously polluted river?
Launched April 7, 2015 Matt Kennard, Claire Provost
Aid agencies and NGOs are increasingly partnering with large corporations. Is this the answer to global development in the 21st century—or is it just corporate welfare for the One Percent?
Launched March 29, 2015 Michael Edison Hayden, Sami Siva
The India-Pakistan border overflows with heroin. Journalist Michael Edison Hayden and photographer Sami Siva report from the afflicted communities to find out what, if anything, can be done about it.
Launched March 28, 2015 Michael Scott Moore
Journalist Michael Scott Moore was held hostage for 32 months by Somali pirates. He is recovering. Will Somalia ever recover?
Launched March 26, 2015 Matt Black
On September 26, 2014, 43 Mexican students went missing in Iguala, a mountain town in the state of Guerrero. This project explores the long-term issues that gave rise to these events.
Launched March 21, 2015 Jeneen Interlandi
A string of courtroom victories have promised to bring an end to school segregation for Roma students. But implementing those legal decisions has proven as difficult as changing cultural attitudes.
Launched March 12, 2015 Lauren Gelfond Feldinger
Syrian and other international volunteers travel at their own expense to Syrian refugee neighborhoods to teach war-traumatized children that they are not "the lost generation" but future peace-makers.
Launched March 5, 2015 Hannah Berk, Akshay Deverakonda
The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary continue their unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.
Launched March 3, 2015 Spike Johnson
In Myanmar the use of child soldiers remains commonplace but under increasing international pressure small numbers of them are being released from service, returning to parents who thought them dead.
Launched March 2, 2015 Daniella Zalcman
For more than a century, many Western governments operated a network of Indian Residential Schools that were meant to assimilate young indigenous students into mainstream European culture. The results were devastating.
Launched February 25, 2015 Tim McGirk, Jason Motlagh
After dozens of vaccination workers were killed in Afghanistan, polio once again began to spread into the borderlands. The same strain is now re-surfacing in Syria.
Launched February 22, 2015 Kenneth R. Weiss
As the low-lying island nation of Kiribati edges closer to a climate change end game, what will happen to its people, its territory, its sovereignty?
Launched February 19, 2015 George Butler
What happens when after 13 years a foreign fighting force pulls out of a country and the world turns its attention elsewhere. Life goes on, of course, but what does this look like in Afghanistan?
Launched January 27, 2015 John Fitzgerald, Matthew Niederhauser
The Megacity Initiative is a new media venture investigating the sustainable development of burgeoning urban centers around the world in order to more prudently integrate future city dwellers.