Terjemahkan halaman dengan Google

Proyek September 8, 2021

Maine Aquaculture’s Women of the Waterfront Break Barriers

Penulis:
woman collects oysters
Amanda Moeser, owner of Lanes Island Oysters, collects oysters for harvest off the bottom of the ocean in her lease area during low tide. Moeser grows her oysters in earlier stages in cages and then lets them mature on the ocean floor. Image by Grace Terry. Maine, 2021.

It was estimated in 2019 that 80 percent of all of Maine’s aquaculture licenses were held by men, according to Afton Hupper, an outreach and development specialist at the Maine Aquaculture Association. The industry has been growing slowly in the state since the 1800s and at its peak in 2019 the harvest was valued at $88 million, according to Maine’s Department of Marine Resources. Throughout this time, aquaculture in Maine has seen many changes, but some of the women are calling for change in representation on the waterfront.

This is not only a problem in Maine. Worldwide, 14 percent of the nearly 60 million people who work in fisheries and aquaculture are women, according to a 2018 report from the Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations. Some women in Maine are trying to overcome these issues by speaking out or starting companies such as the Lady Shuckers and Minorities in Aquaculture.

RELATED ISSUES

A yellow elephant

Issue

Environment and Climate Change

Environment and Climate Change
Women

Issue

Women

Women