Resource June 22, 2017

Meet the Journalist: Sarah A. Topol

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From "The Stolen Children" Pulitzer Center project. Image by Glenna Gordon. Nigeria, 2017.
English

Boko Haram has kidnapped the children of northeastern Nigeria—estimates range as high as 10,000 boys...

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A young woman walks through Custom House, a large IDP camp on the outskirts of Maiduguri that is home to over 9,000 people. There are more than 1.7 million displaced in Northern Nigeria alone, and the number of shelters at refugee camps does not meet the needs of the huge population. The camps that do exist are often cut off from town and markets and frequent sites of suicide bombs. Image by Sarah A. Topol. Nigeria, 2017.
A young woman walks through Custom House, a large IDP camp on the outskirts of Maiduguri that is home to over 9,000 people. There are more than 1.7 million displaced in Northern Nigeria alone, and the number of shelters at refugee camps does not meet the needs of the huge population. The camps that do exist are often cut off from town and markets and frequent sites of suicide bombs. Image by Sarah A. Topol. Nigeria, 2017.

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In January 2017, photographer Glenna Gordon and writer Sarah Topol traveled to Nigeria for one month to report a story for The New York Times Magazine about Boko Haram's child abductions. They heard the stories of children, many of whom served as soldiers. Some provided tactical or logistical support while others were trained to use weapons. The young girls were forcibly married, often to more than one man.

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