Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Mission to Ukraine

Wisconsin Army National Guard members overseeing the training of Ukrainian armed forces are reluctant characters in the impeachment case against President Donald Trump.

After Dictatorship

The world watched in awe as the Sudanese people brought about the downfall of long-time dictator Omar al-Bashir in April 2019. Can Sudan now excavate itself from 30 years of dictatorship?

Ukraine Peace Talks

Will peace talks between Ukraine and Russia result in an end to the war in Eastern Ukraine?

Estonia: The Threat Next Door

Hani Zaitoun examines Estonia's defense capabilities and its special relationship with its Russian neighbor and the Russian ethnic minority that makes up almost 30 percent of Estonia's population.

Refugees in Colombia

With the recent announcement that all stateless babies born of Venezuelan parents would receive Colombian citizenship, the international community saw it as a victory, a brave response in the face of crisis. But these refugee families’ problems are far from solved.

Planning Like a Journalist

In this lesson, students learn about the experience of international reporting from Iona Craig’s work in Yemen and her reflections on the reporting process.