Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Ukraine, Russia Prepare for Peace Talks After Years of War

After nearly six years of war, the Ukrainian and Russian presidents are preparing to meet this week for the first time. The historic peace talks come as impeachment hearings continue in the U.S. Simon Ostrovsky reports from the frontlines of eastern Ukraine with a look ahead at the negotiations that could change the fate of those living in conflict.

Race, Reunion, and Redemption

Judy Gladney and her late husband, Eric Vickers, were among the first African Americans to attend their suburban St. Louis high school. As her 50th class reunion approaches, Judy describes their struggle.

Will Afghanistan Find Peace?

As the United States negotiates its withdrawal from Afghanistan after 18 years of war, what is it leaving behind?

The Psyche of Syria's War Survivors

This project profiles the courageous journey of Syrian teenage social media icon Muhammad Najem and sheds light on the psychological picture of refugees who live or have family under regime bombings.

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