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Pulitzer Center Update August 27, 2018

The Week: An Uncertain Future for Yemen's Families

Media: Authors:
Yemen: The Health of the Nation Project Photo.
English

Two and a half years of war has worn Yemen down. The cholera outbreak, with over one million cases...

Shafai Saleh Hadi (left) laughs with local boys on the shore of Bir Fuqum. As a first-generation fisherman, he sees the job as a better route for his sons than attending school, since employment is incredibly scarce in Yemen. Image by Alex Potter. Yemen, 2018.
Shafai Saleh Hadi (left) laughs with local boys on the shore of Bir Fuqum. As a first-generation fisherman, he sees the job as a better route for his sons than attending school, since employment is incredibly scarce in Yemen. Image by Alex Potter. Yemen, 2018.

Fathers, Sons, and War
Alex Potter

Like other Yemenis, teacher Yahya Abdullah is exhausted by Yemen's grinding war. He wants more for his 13-year-old son, Salah, and has a different attitude toward parenting than his own father. “My father was tough with me, and his grandfather before him,” he says. “It was a tribal way. They were strict, disciplining us and making us work, but I’m educated. I want to push my son in a different way.” Alex Potter, writing and photographing for National Geographic, spends time with Yemeni fathers and sons of different backgrounds and perspectives, and examines how the war has impacted their relationships.

Today, Explained. Image by Vox
Today, Explained. Image by Vox.

The Slippery Slope to Autocracy
Zack Beauchamp

What does it look like when a democracy quietly backslides into autocracy? Vox’s Zack Beauchamp went to Hungary to explore the country's troubling political transformation under Prime Minister Viktor Orban.

In this Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018 photo, Eritrean migrant Gharmay Negassi works at a barbershop in Tel Aviv, Israel. African migrants coming into Israel have been detained, threatened with deportation, and faced hostility from lawmakers and residents. Now, they face another burden: a de facto 20 percent salary cut that has squeezed them financially and driven them further into poverty. Image by Caron Creighton. Israel, 2017.
In this Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018 photo, Eritrean migrant Gharmay Negassi works at a barbershop in Tel Aviv, Israel. African migrants coming into Israel have been detained, threatened with deportation, and faced hostility from lawmakers and residents. Now, they face another burden: a de facto 20 percent salary cut that has squeezed them financially and driven them further into poverty. Image by Caron Creighton. Israel, 2017.

Israeli Efforts to Push Out Migrants
Caron Creighton

According to a recent law, Israel withholds 20 percent from the paychecks of African migrants, returning the earnings only if they leave the country. As UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism student fellow Caron Creighton reports for the Associated Press, the law is forcing migrants to take desperate measures.

Syrian refugees strike in front of Budapest Keleti railway station. Image by Mstyslav Chernov. Hungary, 2015. (CC BY-SA 4.0)
English

Since the twin shocks of 2016—the Brexit vote and Donald Trump's victory—there has been a global...

In this Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018 photo, Eritrean migrant Gharmay Negassi works at a barbershop in Tel Aviv, Israel. African migrants coming into Israel have been detained, threatened with deportation, and faced hostility from lawmakers and residents. Now, they face another burden: a de facto 20 percent salary cut that has squeezed them financially and driven them further into poverty. Image by Caron Creighton. Israel, 2017.
English

Ninety-two percent of asylum seekers in Israel come from Eritrea and Sudan; however, Israel accepts...

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