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Pulitzer Center Update November 21, 2017

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

Media:
A Rohingya refugee displays her scars. Image by Doug Bock Clark. Myanmar, 2017.
English

For over half a century, Myanmar was one of the most isolated countries in the world, ruled by a...

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Multiple Authors
A family with their newly constructed shelter outside Balukhali Refugee Camp. Image by Doug Bock Clark. Bangladesh, 2017.
A family with their newly constructed shelter outside Balukhali Refugee Camp. Image by Doug Bock Clark. Bangladesh, 2017.

Fear of the 'G-word'

Doug Bock Clark

The Rohingya have been stripped of citizenship, prevented from having children, and systematically murdered. But as Doug Bock Clark writes for The Guardian, many nations are loath to describe these atrocities as genocide, because doing so would compel them to “prevent and punish it” under the Genocide Convention of the United Nations. “If the United States were to label attacks against the Rohingya a genocide," Doug writes, "it could potentially commit the Trump administration to using the American military to defend Muslim refugees at the same time it is trying to ban them from entering the country.”

A 66-year-old woman in the Indian village of Hassapur relaxes in her garden. She received treatment for her depression through a lay counseling program. Image by Joanne Silberner.
A 66-year-old woman in the Indian village of Hassapur relaxes in her garden. She received treatment for her depression through a lay counseling program. Image by Joanne Silberner.

Putting Mental Health on a Global Map

Joanne Silberner

There’s been a long struggle to get mental illnesses recognized as a major global health challenge. Joanne Silberner tells the story—and gauges the impact of recent changes—for Discover Magazine.

The author’s older son at his school in Morocco. Image by Jackie Spinner. Morocco, 2017.
The author’s older son at his school in Morocco. Image by Jackie Spinner. Morocco, 2017.

Schooling Autistic Children in Morocco

Jackie Spinner

The challenges for an American mother raising two autistic children in Morocco are complex. They include finding a suitable school and helping the kids adjust in a language they don’t understand. Jackie Spinner writes a personal account for The Washington Post. ​

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