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Story Publication logo March 14, 2022

Protect Indigenous Cultures, Save Forests in Bangka Belitung Islands (bahasa Indonesia)

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Three people look at the camera, in the foreground is a house.
English

After political reforms in Indonesia in 1998, about 13,565 hectares of forest belonging to the state...

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This story excerpt was translated from bahasa Indonesia. To read the original story in full, visit Mongabay. You may also view the original story on the Rainforest Journalism Fund website here. Our RJF website is available in English, Spanish, bahasa Indonesia, French, and Portuguese.



Atuk Sukar (left) and Abok Geboi (right), two indigenous figures of the Mapur Tribe, who guard the community that since hundreds of years ago was considered an isolated or not modern society by the conquerors. Image by Nopri Ismi/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Most of the people living around the hills and coasts of the Bangka Belitung Islands are indigenous people. For example, the Mapur Tribe, the Jerieng Tribe, the Sawang Tribe, the Sekak Tribe, and various other Malay tribes. Their existence must be recognized and protected, so that the forests and seas in these islands can be restored and conserved.


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"The Mapur Tribe, one of the indigenous peoples of the old Malay Tribe in the Bangka Belitung Islands who lost their forests. Many indigenous peoples from the old Malay Tribe in this province have the same fate as the Mapur Tribe," said Jessix Amundian, Director of Walhi [Wahana Lingkungan Lingkungan Indonesia] Bangka Belitung Islands, late February 2022.

For example, the Jerieng Tribe who live around Bukit Penyabung [300 meters], spread across 13 villages; Pelangas, Kundi, Mayang, Paradong, Air Nyatoh, Beaver, Rambat, Simpang Gong, Simpang Tiga, Ibul, Pangek, Bukit Terak, and Menduyung Water [West Bangka Regency].


The expanse of the customary forest of Mount Tuing [300 meters]. Image by Taufik Wijaya/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Atuk Sukar (68), Head of Mapur Tribal Customs in Pejem Hamlet, Gunung Pelawan Village, Bangka Regency, Bangka Belitung Islands. Image by Nopri Ismi/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

The road to the hut belongs to the Mapur Tribe in the traditional forest of Benak. Image by Nopri Ismi/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

The forest barrier road prohibits Bukit Tabun with the traditional forest of Benak. Image by Nopri Ismi/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

The expanse of Benak forest, which the Mapur Tribe hopes to be recognized by the government as its customary forest. Image by Taufik Wijaya/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

Since childhood, the soles of Abok Geboi (53), the Customary Chairman of Mapur Gunung Muda, explore the customary forests of the Mapur Tribe in the Aik Abik and Benak hamlets. Image by Nopri Ismi/Mongabay Indonesia. Indonesia, 2022.

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