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Story Publication logo June 1, 2020

How Coronavirus Changed the Lebanese Revolution

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A family walks in Hamra, Beirut. Stores and restaurants are closed due to the Covid-19 virus. Image by Hassan Chamoun / Shutterstock.com. Lebanon, 2020.
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In its first season, Almostajad will focus on the COVID-19 crisis and will transition into a weekly...

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Cityscape of Martyrs' square, Beirut Downtown, Lebanon with lebanese flag sailer for the occasion of the protest against corruption. Image by Stphanie CROCQ / Shutterstock.com. Lebanon, 2020.
Cityscape of Martyrs' square, Beirut Downtown, Lebanon with lebanese flag sailer for the occasion of the protest against corruption. Image by Stphanie CROCQ / Shutterstock.com. Lebanon, 2020.

The coronavirus crisis initially halted the protests that erupted in Lebanon last October. But economic collapse and soaring prices soon drove revolutionaries back to the streets, resulting in the death of twenty-six-year-old protester Fawwaz Fouad Al-Seman by security forces.

What has changed in the uprising during the pandemic? Did the government use the quarantine to control the revolutionary movement's activities?

In this episode of Almostajad, we meet Lebanese journalists John Qassir and Diana Muqalled. They discuss the lockdown's impact on the revolution and how the Lebanese government used this time to create even stricter policies. We also listen to protestors who describe the changing trajectory of the uprising.

This episode was hosted by Abir Kopty, written by Mahmoud Alkhawaja, and edited by Tayseer Kabbani. Research for this episode was conducted by Rawan Nakhleh. The executive producer of Almostajad is Ramsey Tesdell.

To listen to the full episode in Arabic, click here.

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