Event

Congo/Women Exhibition at London School of Economics

Josephine Gambolipai, 13 years old, was abducted in July 2009 and escaped in December 2009 as a result of an attack by the military of the Democratic Republic of Congo (FARDC). She was saved as a wife for Joseph Kony and therefore only had to carry light clothes and was not forced to work. (Photo by Marcus Bleasdale)

Josephine Gambolipai, 13 years old, was abducted in July 2009 and escaped in December 2009 as a result of an attack by the military of the Democratic Republic of Congo (FARDC). She was saved as a wife for Joseph Kony and therefore only had to carry light clothes and was not forced to work. (Photo by Marcus Bleasdale)

Monday, October 18, 2010 - 10:00AM to Wednesday, October 27, 2010 - 8:00PM

Photographs from Lynsey Addario, Pulitzer Center journalist Marcus Bleasdale, Ron Haviv, and James Nachtwey will be on display from October 18 to 27, 2010 in the Atrium Gallery of the Old Building at the London School of Economics. The free exhibition will be open Monday through Friday from 10am-8pm, except on October 20 when general admission closes at 6pm.

From the London School of Economics website:

Congo/Women is an internationally touring photography exhibition and educational campaign that raises awareness of the widespread sexual violence facing women and girls in the DRC. The exhibition features powerful photographs by award-winning photojournalists Lynsey Addario, Marcus Bleasdale, Ron Haviv and James Nachtwey that convey the strength and courage of Congolese women. Accompanying essays contextualise the impact of the crisis from a range of perspectives.

The exhibition is co-created and produced by the Art Works Project and the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media, Columbia College, Chicago. The organisers gratefully acknowledge the support of the UNFPA, the Oak Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts in providing funding for the exhibition.

The exhibition in the Atrium is being hosted with the support of the Crisis States Research Centre (CSRC) at the LSE Department of International Development. The CSRC is a leading centre of interdisciplinary research into processes of war, state collapse and reconstruction and has undertaken research in DRCongo as part of its ongoing programme. Further information about CSRC research can be found at: www.crisisstates.com.