Tags

Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees

War, economic crisis and climate change can trigger mass migrations of people. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees” feature reporting that covers refugees, migrants and internally displaced people. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on migrants, displaced people and refugees.

 

The Exceptional State

A deep dive into what made California historically stand out from the rest of the United States and then stand up to a sitting president.

Eritrean Asylum Seekers in Israel

This field note tells the story of a single mother from Eritrea, seeking asylum in Israel, and some of the struggles she has faced after she injured her hand and became unable to work.

The Survivors of the Rohingya Genocide

An investigation into Myanmar's state-orchestrated murder of thousands of Rohingya Muslims — and the second tragedy unfolding in the refugee camps

Greenland's Vanishing Villages

The Danish government's push for modernization left many small Greenland hunting communities reeling, and now their women may never return.

A Retreat From Massacre

The T'boli-Dulangan Manobo, an indigenous group in the Philippines, lived peacefully in the village of Sitio Datalbonglangon—until the country's armed forces showed up.

Displacement in Sarawak

The Malaysian government has routinely put private-sector interests and infrastructure projects ahead of the livelihoods of indigenous people.

After ISIS, Iraq Is Still Broken

One year after the liberation of Mosul, distrust, fear, and a paralyzing sense of insecurity plague the country’s religious and ethnic minorities.

August 15, 2018

Eritrean and Sudanese Asylum Seekers in Israel

Caron Creighton

Asylum seekers to Israel are faced with a number of struggles. For example, there are many anti-immigrant polices that force them into undesirable situations in order to remain in the country.

August 10, 2018

Myanmar's Rohingya: Anatomy of a Genocide

Jason Motlagh, Mark Oltmann, Patrick Brown

In 2017, Myanmar’s military targeted Rohingya Muslims in a pogrom of mass murder and rape. We investigate the deadliest massacre of a state-orchestrated genocide, years in the making.

August 03, 2018

A Safe Place to Learn and Grow

Jaime Joyce

Who are the Rohingya? Why have they fled Myanmar? "A Safe Place to Learn and Grow" takes young readers to Bangladesh to learn what is being done to help refugee children heal and access education.

July 19, 2018

Jamaica: Voices of the Windrush Generation

Monica Long

Imagine Jamaican emigrants having their dreams of working in the United Kingdom with full citizenship fulfilled, and then suddenly being evicted from their homes purchased with their blood, sweat, and tears.

July 06, 2018

Religion and Reconstruction in Iraq

Alice Su

As Iraq's religious and ethnic minority groups return to Mosul and the Nineveh plains, how are they supposed to rebuild not only their homes, but also their relations with one another?

July 05, 2018

Detained, Deported, Deserted

Sylvia Varnham O’Regan

New Zealanders make up the largest group of people inside Australian detention centers, and hundreds have been deported in recent years—an issue that’s causing mounting social and political tensions.

June 28, 2018

Families Divided

Texas Tribune Staff

The Texas Tribune is shining a bright light on the U.S.-Mexico border in the aftermath of the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy that separated children from their parents.

June 28, 2018

An Unexpected Sanctuary

Lucian Perkins

During World War II, a French village helped Jews escape the Nazis at great peril. Today, as the world turns its back on refugees, they welcome them. We explore why.

May 17, 2018

Inside Yemen

Marcia Biggs, Javier Manzano

As the conflict in Yemen enters its fourth year, PBS NewsHour 's Marcia Biggs travels to the Middle East's poorest nation to report on what the U.N. is calling the "world's worst humanitarian crisis."

May 15, 2018

We Became Fragments

Lacy Jane Roberts, Luisa Conlon, Hanna Miller

After losing his mother and four siblings in a bombing that left him injured, Syrian teenager Ibraheem Sarhan and his father make a new life for themselves in Winnipeg, Canada.

Meet the Journalist: Tom Gardner

Tom Gardner discusses his reporting as he follows the railway from Addis Ababa to the Djibouti coast examining efforts of the Ethiopian government to use grand infrastructure to develop a poor region.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa Noel

As they immigrate for a chance to provide for their famlies, parents are leaving their children behind in Jamaica—possibly creating a mental health problem among Jamaican youth.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

Journalist Alice Su speaks about her 2017 project on religion among resettled refugees in Germany, a country that has accepted more asylum seekers than any other European country.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Poverty in America

This Week: Nearly one in five children in America suffers from being poor, deportations are straining relations between Australia and New Zealand, and ISIS has undermined faith in Iraq.

Beyond War: The Rohingya: A Genocide On Our Watch?

At a Beyond War conference panel, journalists and Pulitzer Center grantees discuss their reporting on the Rohingya crisis while the former Ambassador to Burma explained attempts by the United States to curb the persecution.

What Is Home?

Students explore ideas of “home” in connection to refugees worldwide and homelessness locally by analyzing images and text from Finding Home and creating their own photo stories that reflect their...

Planning Like a Journalist

In this lesson, students learn about the experience of international reporting from Iona Craig’s work in Yemen and her reflections on the reporting process.