Tags

Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees

War, economic crisis and climate change can trigger mass migrations of people. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees” feature reporting that covers refugees, migrants and internally displaced people. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on migrants, displaced people and refugees.

 

A Teenager Starting Over in Canada

Samantha Power met Ibraheem Sarhan in 2014 after his home in Syria was bombed. Here, having watched this Op-Doc film, she reflects on his progress.

Kids of Kakuma

TIME for Kids travels to Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya to learn what life is like for children who live and go to school there.

Jewish Poland: A Lost Connection, a Forgotten Identity

When Polish Jews immigrated to Israel, they shaped and adopted a new, Zionist identity. Today, Polish Jews and non-Jewish Poles re-examine complex memories, a shared past, and the roots of judgment about each other's nations.

April 14, 2017

India: Migrating Into Slavery

Yardain Amron

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

April 12, 2017

A Postcard Home

Diana Markosian

"A Postcard Home" is a collaborative series exploring a remarkable chapter in human migration through the viewpoint of a child.

April 10, 2017

Finding Home in an Era of Displacement

Jeanne Carstensen

What is home for war refugees and the communities trying to integrate them? Where do conflicts arise and how do diverse people find common ground? A series about war refugees starting over in Europe.

April 03, 2017

We Have No Choice

Ben Taub

Most African migrants heading to Europe unwittingly follow the ancient caravan routes of the trans-Saharan slave trade. Along the way, many are trafficked, sold, and brutally exploited.

February 22, 2017

The East African Migrant Smuggling Trail

Michael Scott Moore

Smugglers along the trail from East Africa to Europe, through Libya, tend to look after their own. Are former Somali pirates running Somali migrants?

January 13, 2017

Singapore Runaways

Xyza Cruz Bacani

Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?

January 04, 2017

China's Human Snakes Return

Rong Xiaoqing

Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

December 20, 2016

The Missing Migrants: Families Search for Answers

Aaron Nelsen, Julysa Sosa

For years Central Americans have transited Mexico en route to the United States, many are never heard from again. In a country teeming with the disappeared, Central American mothers search for theirs.

December 19, 2016

Finding Home

Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni

Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.

December 12, 2016

The Gulf Art War

Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang

The world’s leading architects, the most vulnerable laborers, and a movement of concerned artists converge on a man-made island in the Persian Gulf called Saadiyat, which means “happiness” in Arabic.

December 08, 2016

Guna Yala Sinking

Zachary Slobig

The sea level rise clock ticks loudly for those who call the Guna Yala islands of Panama home. Will a pending migration to the mainland serve as a model of progressive climate change adaptation?

Meet the Journalist: Alexandria Bombach

Documentary filmmaker Alexandria Bombach talks about the making of "Afghanistan by Choice," a film that features the lives of five Afghans who are choosing to stay, leave on a special visa, or leave illegally.

Meet the Journalist: Sharron Lovell

Like so many of Mao’s pronouncements, it sounded simple: “The South has a lot of water; the North lacks water. So if it can be done, borrowing a little water and bringing it up might do the trick.”

Meet the Journalist: Uri Blau

Uri Blau used U.S. and Israeli tax records to connect the dots between American tax-exempt charities and their Israeli beneficiaries operating over the Green Line.

Meet the Journalist: Sim Chi Yin

Photojournalist Sim Chi Yin discusses her reporting on a family affected by silicosis, an occupational lung disease that affects an estimated 6 million in China, most of them miners.

This Week: Living on the Margins

This week: Economic despair drives migration to Moscow, the Catholic Church's response to Duterte's killings, and PBS NewsHour revisits reporting on the US's nuclear arsenal.

Gender Lens: Refugees and Migration

Journalists and activists joined together for a conversation on the impact of gender and gender roles on the refugee experience—exploring how the most vulnerable are affected and how they cope.

A Right to Water for Everyone?

This is a multi-week unit on water rights and access. Students examine the causes of water shortages across the globe and explore solutions to ensure that all people have access to clean, safe...

Who Am I?

This multi-week unit for grades 3-5 on the Out of Eden project can be divided for individual lesson plans. Students explore human migration and its impact by generating digital media.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.