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Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees

War, economic crisis and climate change can trigger mass migrations of people. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees” feature reporting that covers refugees, migrants and internally displaced people. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on migrants, displaced people and refugees.

 

How the Cuban Migration Story Is Changing

A Cuban family treks through a jungle for seven days on foot. Another Cuban man gets stuck in Central America seeking freedom. Listen to their stories on 1A.

The Untold Quiet of Kurdistan

What the Vietnamese photographer Lam Duc-Hein first imagined of Iraq were tanks and violence, surges and refugees. But in Iraqi Kurdistan he found something different and beautiful.

Migrant Life in Qatar

In Qatar and other Gulf countries, mostly low skilled migrant women pay the price for the crime of zina, which criminalizes unmarried sex and pregnancy out of wedlock.

The Waterkeeper of Iraq

Water scarcity is becoming an increasingly pressing issue in the country's north, but one man is hoping to change that.

The End of the Journey

In the new era of Cuban migration, Ivo Torres' future depends on being able to answer a key question: in the XXI century, are Cubans political or economic migrants?

Returning to Sosua

Emily Codik was surprised by the island's transformation from a safe haven for Holocaust refugees to a sex-tourism hotspot.

August 11, 2016

Fractured Lands

Scott Anderson, Ben Solomon, Paolo Pellegrin

The unraveling of the modern Middle East, from the Iraq War to the rise of ISIS and the global refugee crisis. A landmark collaboration with The New York Times Magazine .

July 19, 2016

Running the Gap

Jason Motlagh

In their bid to reach the United States, a growing number of migrants fleeing poverty and conflicts at home are braving the treacherous Darién Gap. Many never emerge.

July 12, 2016

Central African Republic: Conflict and Promise

Elliott Woods

With a population numbering just 5 million, Central African Republic is a microcosm of sub-Saharan Africa's most enduring political and humanitarian crises. It is also the site of one of the continent's most ambitious attempts at preserving biodiversity.

June 22, 2016

The Stolen Generation

Sarah A. Topol, Glenna Gordon

“You people will know your mistakes,” one boy was told. “You have come to where you will enjoy your life.”

June 09, 2016

Afghanistan by Choice

Alexandria Bombach

Many Afghans are grappling with the decision to leave or stay in Afghanistan right now. Their choice is not a simple one, as they stand to lose so much no matter what they decide.

June 07, 2016

Islam with Chinese Characteristics

Alice Su

China's Muslim minorities make up only two percent of the population, but comprise 20 million people. How do they relate to Islam, the state, the majority Han Chinese and one another?

May 25, 2016

Ukraine's Most Vulnerable, Two Years On

Julia Barton, Sophie Pinkham, Misha Friedman

Two years after Euromaidan, the Russian seizure of Crimea and conflicts in eastern Ukraine, a depressing new reality has sunk in for many displaced Ukrainians: they're not getting their old lives back.

Meet the Journalist: Sim Chi Yin

Photojournalist Sim Chi Yin discusses her reporting on a family affected by silicosis, an occupational lung disease that affects an estimated 6 million in China, most of them miners.

Meet the Journalist: Alia Malek

One hundred years after the Armenian genocide in Turkey, Alia Malek examines how sectarian allegiances are erasing history as she explores the fate of those living in Turkey, Syria, and Armenia.

The Nanny's Child

This 45-minute lesson uses a radio piece and photo essay to prompt discussion about immigration and the phenomenon of transnational parenting.

Thinking Like a Journalist

Guide students through the process of investigating images, evaluating captions, and exploring slow journalism.

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