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Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees

War, economic crisis and climate change can trigger mass migrations of people. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees” feature reporting that covers refugees, migrants and internally displaced people. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on migrants, displaced people and refugees.

 

Only the Bridge Matters Now

Northern Virginia’s Bolivian community is up to 150,000, enough to be Bolivia’s 9th largest city. By sustaining tradition, memory, and love for their hometowns, the community keeps families united.

Keeping Refugees in Africa

Since last summer, the flow of refugees from Libya to Europe has shrunk considerably. The EU attributes this to its own successful policy, but reality is a lot more depressing.

Finding Therapy in Jordan

With only 60 to 100 psychiatrists in Jordan, there's little help for Syrian refugees. Local organizations and refugees are leading the work to ensure that refugees get the therapy that they need.

Finding Home

Crisis in Syria sent millions fleeing to Europe. This is the journey of one family TIME followed for a year as they left their homeland behind to begin a new life.

January 04, 2017

China's Human Snakes Return

Rong Xiaoqing

Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

December 20, 2016

The Missing Migrants: Families Search for Answers

Aaron Nelsen, Julysa Sosa

For years Central Americans have transited Mexico en route to the United States, many are never heard from again. In a country teeming with the disappeared, Central American mothers search for theirs.

December 19, 2016

Finding Home

Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni

Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.

December 12, 2016

The Gulf Art War

Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang

The world’s leading architects, the most vulnerable laborers, and a movement of concerned artists converge on a man-made island in the Persian Gulf called Saadiyat, which means “happiness” in Arabic.

December 08, 2016

Guna Yala Sinking

Zachary Slobig

The sea level rise clock ticks loudly for those who call the Guna Yala islands of Panama home. Will a pending migration to the mainland serve as a model of progressive climate change adaptation?

December 03, 2016

Cuba After Fidel

Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin

While many in Cuba mourn the passing of Fidel Castro, others are more than ready for change.

November 23, 2016

Mexico Considers Trump

Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin

Donald Trump has targeted Mexico more than any other country, promising to build a wall, deport millions of Mexicans from the U.S., and cancel NAFTA. PBS NewsHour examines how Mexico is responding.

November 14, 2016

Traces of Exile

Tomas van Houtryve

As 21st century refugees cross Europe with their smartphones, they've left behind a trail of digital breadcrumbs documenting their exile.

September 16, 2016

The End of Europe

Joshua Kucera

Examining the cultural, historical, and political meanings of Europe by traveling along its geographical border with Asia.

September 15, 2016

Are Refugees Welcome in Europe?

Ben Mauk, George Butler

The crisis in Europe has created entire towns of refugees in rural Germany and prompted an epidemic of xenophobic arson attacks across the country.

Meet the Journalist: Sharron Lovell

Like so many of Mao’s pronouncements, it sounded simple: “The South has a lot of water; the North lacks water. So if it can be done, borrowing a little water and bringing it up might do the trick.”

Meet the Journalist: Uri Blau

Uri Blau used U.S. and Israeli tax records to connect the dots between American tax-exempt charities and their Israeli beneficiaries operating over the Green Line.

Meet the Journalist: Sim Chi Yin

Photojournalist Sim Chi Yin discusses her reporting on a family affected by silicosis, an occupational lung disease that affects an estimated 6 million in China, most of them miners.

Meet the Journalist: Alia Malek

One hundred years after the Armenian genocide in Turkey, Alia Malek examines how sectarian allegiances are erasing history as she explores the fate of those living in Turkey, Syria, and Armenia.

Who Am I?

This multi-week unit for grades 3-5 on the Out of Eden project can be divided for individual lesson plans. Students explore human migration and its impact by generating digital media.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.