Projects

Launched February 17, 2017 Miriam Berger
Journalist Miriam Berger reports on the impact of privatization policies on Israeli and Palestinian security, labor, and welfare sectors—among the most important, and overlooked, developments shapi
Launched February 10, 2017 Jahd Khalil
Egypt’s infrastructure has real life costs for its citizens, and requires targeted and accountable investment. Can the government make the right ones?
Launched February 6, 2017 Caitlin Bawn
High levels of poverty and malnutrition in the UK are triggering a re-emergence of related “Victorian” diseases, such as scurvy, rickets and TB—and even cholera and diphtheria. But who is most at risk?
Launched February 6, 2017 Geneive Abdo
After years of the raging wars in Iraq and Syria, most people still think the conflicts are about territory and political power. But religious practice and belief have a lot to do with it.
Launched January 31, 2017 Joanne Silberner
Mental illnesses take a huge toll on people in low and middle income countries, yet they're virtually ignored by most governments and aid agencies. That's starting to change.
Launched January 23, 2017 Jon Sawyer
Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley will tour high schools and universities with the Pulitzer Center's Executive Director Jon Sawyer starting in February 2017.
Launched January 19, 2017 James Fenton
A new president is elected in the Philippines on a promise that he will crack down on drugs, dealers and users. Thousands of poor people have already been killed.
Launched January 19, 2017 May Jeong
The task of making peace in Afghanistan seem to have fallen on the shoulders of unlikely men. This is the story of their efforts to end the war in Afghanistan.
Launched January 16, 2017 Jonathan Blitzer
Thousands of Salvadorans deported by the Obama Administration find a surprising new life in an unfamiliar homeland.
Launched January 13, 2017 Xyza Bacani
Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?
Launched January 10, 2017 Rachel Bronson, John Mecklin
Can and should nuclear power play a significant role in combating climate change?
Launched January 4, 2017 Rong Xiaoqing
Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?
Launched January 2, 2017 Cassandra Vinograd
Mass killings, mass rape, ethnic cleansing, starvation and a lack of international will to act against the specter of genocide: A rare look inside the crisis in South Sudan.
Launched December 23, 2016 Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.
Launched December 20, 2016 Aaron Nelsen, Julysa Sosa
For years Central Americans have transited Mexico en route to the United States, many are never heard from again. In a country teeming with the disappeared, Central American mothers search for theirs.
Launched December 19, 2016 Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker
Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.
Launched December 19, 2016 Martin Fletcher
What will happen when Robert Mugabe's 36-year rule in Zimbabwe ends? Will life for millions of his oppressed, destitute countrymen get better—or even worse?
Launched December 15, 2016 Michael Kavanagh
An investigation into the business and financial links of Congo's President Joseph Kabila as he clings to power, throwing the country into a constitutional crisis.
Launched December 14, 2016 Ewen MacAskill
Roberto Kozak is virtually unknown. And yet this quiet man played a crucial role after the 1973 coup in Chile and he helped tens of thousands of prisoners out of custody and to find safe havens overseas.
Launched December 14, 2016 Meta Krese, Jošt Franko
From cotton farms in Burkina Faso to sweatshops in Bangladesh and Romania, a story of the real costs of our globalized economy.
Launched December 12, 2016 Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang
The world’s leading architects, the most vulnerable laborers, and a movement of concerned artists converge on a man-made island in the Persian Gulf called Saadiyat, which means “happiness” in Arabic.
Launched December 9, 2016 Jason Motlagh
Thousands of people have been executed on the streets of the Philippines since President Rodrigo Duterte launched his all-out war on drugs. But shooting his way out of the problem is taking a heavy toll.
Launched December 8, 2016 Zachary Slobig
The sea level rise clock ticks loudly for those who call the Guna Yala islands of Panama home. Will a pending migration to the mainland serve as a model of progressive climate change adaptation?
Launched December 7, 2016 Sarah Fahmy
An exploration into the emerging industry of underwater mining leads to more questions than answers. With time running out before this practice begins, are we acting irresponsibly?