Region

North America

While Reporting "The Taking," Another Scandal

A local political power broker. A shady contract that poured taxpayer money into his pocket—and his family’s pockets. Our initial digging on the main project unearthed another important story.

Outrage and Inspire

Roger Thurow shares stories of hunger across the world in a new podcast produced in collaboration with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

Finding Border Landowners Was Harder Than Expected

Starting with hundreds of cases, we reached out to dozens of property owners who lost land for the border fence. Some had died, some deflected questions to lawyers, and many just didn’t want to talk to us.

A Few Things to Know About Why Treaties Matter

The U.S. has ratified more than 370 treaties with American Indian nations. Yet many Americans know little about the treaties that shaped, and continue to impact, the country today.

June 08, 2015

The Geography of Poverty

Matt Black

The Geography of Poverty is a digital documentary project that combines geotagged photographs with census data to create a modern portrait of poverty in the US.

April 07, 2015

The Business of Aid

Matt Kennard, Claire Provost

Aid agencies and NGOs are increasingly partnering with large corporations. Is this the answer to global development in the 21st century—or is it just corporate welfare for the One Percent?

March 26, 2015

Guerrero: The Monster in the Mountains

Matt Black

On September 26, 2014, 43 Mexican students went missing in Iguala, a mountain town in the state of Guerrero. This project explores the long-term issues that gave rise to these events.

March 05, 2015

William & Mary 2014-2015 Sharp Reporting Projects

Hannah Berk, Akshay Deverakonda, Alexis Foxworth, Akela Lacy , Rachel Merriman-Goldring , Katharine Sucher, Becca Thorpe, Ellen Wexler

The Pulitzer Center and The College of William & Mary continue their unique initiative to provide deeper global learning and storytelling experiences for students.

October 02, 2014

Cholera: A Tale of Two Cities

Sonia Shah

The cholera epidemic that hit Haiti four years ago bears some startling resemblances to one that devastated Manhattan two centuries earlier.

June 09, 2014

The Big Picture: Alberta’s Oil Sands

Daniel Grossman, Alex MacLean

Alberta’s oil sands region is at the heart of the KeystoneXL pipeline controversy. A project built on aerial photographs from 1,000 feet up brings into sharp focus the project's scale—and stakes.

May 18, 2014

Wasted

Karim Chrobog

About a third of all the food we produce goes to waste. What we thoughtlessly leave to rot in fields, landfills, and our own refrigerators could alleviate world hunger and help reverse climate change.

May 06, 2014

The Nanny's Child

Alissa Quart, Alice Proujansky

Millions of women from poor countries come to work in America as caregivers or nannies. Who looks after their children back home?

April 18, 2014

Blue Sky Days

Tomas van Houtryve

A drone's-eye view of America reveals the changing nature of war, privacy, and government transparency.

Capturing the ‘I’iwi

Hawaii's ‘i’iwi honeycreeper may not last another generation and its extinction would change the biological diversity and culture of the islands.

Labor Policy in the 2012 Farm Bill

Every five years the federal government passes a Farm Bill to outline agriculture and food policy. This year, interest groups are trying to get a policy protecting farmworker rights included.

"The End of AIDS?" Wins an Emmy

Another big win PBS NewsHour, Science, and the Pulitzer Center, for "The End of AIDS?" Finding new ways to tell stories that matter on issues that affect us all.

This Week: Stumbling Toward Nuclear War

This week: rising nuclear tensions through North Korea's eyes, refugees converting to Christianity, and how the exotic pet trade enables illegal wildlife practices in China.

Ending AIDS

Students analyze how journalists William Brangam, Jon Cohen, and Jason Kane unfold an analysis of HIV prevention measures in several locations around the world.  

HIV/AIDS In Palm Beach County, Florida

In this lesson, students will learn about AIDS in Florida, and participate in an activity understand the role of health education and its impact on the AIDS epidemic in the United States.  

Waste disposal

What is the most efficient way to reduce the amount of waste? Can we ever reach the point of waste elimination?

The Nanny's Child

This 45-minute lesson uses a radio piece and photo essay to prompt discussion about immigration and the phenomenon of transnational parenting.

Food Deserts

Our topic under the umbrella of food insecurity is the existence of food deserts in both rural and urban areas within the U.S. and how they compare and/or contrast in their causes and potential...