Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

Detained, Deported, Deserted

New Zealanders make up the largest group of people inside Australian detention centers, and hundreds have been deported in recent years—an issue that’s causing mounting social and political tensions.

Families Divided

The Texas Tribune is shining a bright light on the U.S.-Mexico border in the aftermath of the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy that separated children from their parents.

An Unexpected Sanctuary

During World War II, a French village helped Jews escape the Nazis at great peril. Today, as the world turns its back on refugees, they welcome them. We explore why.

We Became Fragments

After losing his mother and four siblings in a bombing that left him injured, Syrian teenager Ibraheem Sarhan and his father make a new life for themselves in Winnipeg, Canada.

Cambodia's Floating Villages

In Cambodia’s floating villages, tens of thousands of ethnic Vietnamese eke out precarious lives on the Tonle Sap. Born into statelessness, they are not permitted to vote, work, or even live on land.

When Will the Rohingya Refugees Return Home?

Refugees fear the fate that awaits them in Myanmar and are refusing to return without guarantees of safety. In the camps girls face being trafficked into the sex trade or forced into child marriages.

The Only Dental Relief for Many in This West Virginia County is Extraction

After reporting in Alabama and California, NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Simon Ostrovsky visits the final state that the UN says can exemplify some of the country’s most egregious human rights issues. More than one third of residents in McDowell County, West Virginia are below the poverty line, and many of them only have access to dental work when the pain becomes unbearable.

The Caravan is a Climate Change Story

Though the root causes of migration from Central America are largely poverty and entrenched community violence, climate change is a compounding factor causing hundreds of thousands to flee home.

Meet the Journalist: Jackie Spinner

Jackie Spinner spent three months in Morocco exploring the ways in which the country has become a moderate Islamic hub in the North Africa and to examine the contrast between image and reality.

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Max Duncan

Filmmaker and video journalist Max Duncan introduces his project about a family from a remote corner of China. The parents left their children behind in order to give them a better future.

This Week: Poverty in America

This Week: Nearly one in five children in America suffers from being poor, deportations are straining relations between Australia and New Zealand, and ISIS has undermined faith in Iraq.

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