Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

An Unexpected Sanctuary

During World War II, a French village helped Jews escape the Nazis at great peril. Today, as the world turns its back on refugees, they welcome them. We explore why.

We Became Fragments

After losing his mother and four siblings in a bombing that left him injured, Syrian teenager Ibraheem Sarhan and his father make a new life for themselves in Winnipeg, Canada.

Cambodia's Floating Villages

In Cambodia’s floating villages, tens of thousands of ethnic Vietnamese eke out precarious lives on the Tonle Sap. Born into statelessness, they are not permitted to vote, work, or even live on land.

When Will the Rohingya Refugees Return Home?

Refugees fear the fate that awaits them in Myanmar and are refusing to return without guarantees of safety. In the camps girls face being trafficked into the sex trade or forced into child marriages.

The Women Fleeing Saudi Arabia

Pulitzer Center grantee Sarah Aziza discusses what it’s like for women to escape Saudi Arabia when their every move is policed by men.

Beyond Dimensions: The Man Who Married a Hologram

When a 35 year-old man married a hologram, it provoked mixed reactions in Japan and abroad. But researchers believe it suggests broader technological trends and changing social phenomena.

Meet the Journalist: Negar Azimi

As new museums and universities are erected in the Gulf, Negar Azimi reports on the complexities surrounding the use of low-wage migrant labor, with a focus on a group of artist-activists.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Poverty in America

This Week: Nearly one in five children in America suffers from being poor, deportations are straining relations between Australia and New Zealand, and ISIS has undermined faith in Iraq.