Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

November 01, 2016

Navigating the Death Penalty in Pakistan

Shakeeb Asrar, Urooj Kamran Azmi

To counter terrorism, the Pakistani government has started executing all those convicted of terrorism. But they have overlooked whether those convicted received a fair trial or not.

October 27, 2016

Corporate Armies

Matt Kennard, Claire Provost

A massive army has been built up around the world, not to fight traditional wars, but to protect corporate assets around the world.

October 05, 2016

Iraq: The Battle for Mosul

Jane Ferguson

At a critical time in Iraq’s history, Jane Ferguson examines the military forces involved in the battle for Mosul, the role of Iran-based militias and the status of Fallujah post-ISIS.

August 24, 2016

Sudan's ISIS Problem

Kira Zalan

Blacklisted as a state sponsor of terror, Sudan is waging its own fight against the Islamic State group. Can a government that's based itself in Islamist rhetoric part with its past and stay in power?

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

Why do young people from Jordan and Tunisia decide to join militant groups in Syria? Are they driven by ideological, economic, or other factors? How are governments trying to stop them?

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