Issue

On War and Peace

Nearly thirty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

Inside Jordan: Life after the Syrian War

Jordanian Identity is as ambiguous as it is rapidly evolving. After decades of championing coexistence, Jordanian identity remains an elusive social and political phenomenon.

The Rebirth of the Shi'a-Sunni Divide

After years of the raging wars in Iraq and Syria, most people still think the conflicts are about territory and political power. But religious practice and belief have a lot to do with it.

Afghan Peace Talks

The task of making peace in Afghanistan seem to have fallen on the shoulders of unlikely men. This is the story of their efforts to end the war in Afghanistan.

A Look Inside South Sudan's Bitter War

Mass killings, mass rape, ethnic cleansing, starvation and a lack of international will to act against the specter of genocide: A rare look inside the crisis in South Sudan.

Finding Home

Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.

AP Investigation: Food Aid Stolen As Yemen Starves

Documents reviewed by The Associated Press and interviews with al-Hakimi and other officials and aid workers show that thousands of families in Taiz are not getting international food aid intended for them.

Swapping Cocaine for Peace

A voluntary coca crop substitution initiative in Colombia is failing, but it is still the country’s best option to address its cocaine production problem.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

Why do young people from Jordan and Tunisia decide to join militant groups in Syria? Are they driven by ideological, economic, or other factors? How are governments trying to stop them?

Beyond War: The Rohingya: A Genocide On Our Watch?

At a Beyond War conference panel, journalists and Pulitzer Center grantees discuss their reporting on the Rohingya crisis while the former Ambassador to Burma explained attempts by the United States to curb the persecution.

This Week: The U.S.-Mexico Border: A View from Above

This week: Trump's plan to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico is still in question, a growing alliance between Russia and the Central African Republic threaten the U.S.'s influence in the region, and see the highlights of the Pulitzer Center's recent conference weekend.

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