Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

August 23, 2017

The Cookstove Conundrum

Michelle Nijhuis, Lynn Johnson

Nearly half the people on earth use open fires to cook their food and heat their homes, and the price they pay is steep. But changing the world's kitchens is surprisingly complicated.

August 03, 2017

Women and Opportunity in Southern India

Praveena Somasundaram

Praveena Somasundaram from Guilford College traveled to southern India to report on gender inequality in education and the difficulties and opportunities women face in the workplace in both urban and rural areas.

July 17, 2017

Zika’s Lasting Impact on Families in Brazil

Poonam Daryani

Though the Zika outbreak in Brazil has seemingly peaked, its aftermath will be felt by the thousands of families caring for and raising children with Zika-related complications and disabilities.

Guyana: A Morning in Red Village

In Guyana, domestic violence has become a part of everyday life. Campbell Rawlins spends a morning in a housing project to experience what life is like in one of the most isolated communities.

The Boyfriend System: Migrant Life in Qatar

Zina laws treat sex and pregnancy out of wedlock as crimes punishable by imprisonment. But without means to seek legal recourse, it is mostly low-skilled migrant woman who face charges.

Meet the Journalist: Peg Tyre

"Bridge International Academies" is a for-profit company that seeks to educate some of the world’s poorest children. Its Silicon Valley investors call it “revolutionary.” Others are skeptical.

Meet the Journalist: Emily Gogolak

Emily Gogolak, from the field in Tegucigalpa, discusses her reporting on violence against women in Honduras and the deportations of mothers and children from immigration detention centers in Texas.

Privatizing Education in Africa

This week: for-profit schools in the most impoverished places; identifying bodies from the U.S.-Mexico border; and age-based asylum in Sweden.

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