For lawyers Brian Concannon and Mario Joseph, cholera in Haiti isn’t just a deadly disease—it is a question of justice. Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the world, lacks a water and sanitation infrastructure that would have prevented the spread of cholera, a disease that hadn't been seen in the country for decades until it was allegedly re-introduced by United Nations peacekeeping troops.

A case filed against the United Nations to pursue reparations for the victims of the disease has gone nowhere fast, but Concannon and Joseph say they will not let the case disappear.

Project

Before the international response to the earthquake of 2010 one challenge Haiti didn't face was cholera. Now it does, with 7,000 already dead and a continuing challenge for the entire country.

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November 10, 2016 /
Adam Janofsky, Brandice Camara
Pulitzer Center students fellows report from all over the world. Join us for this photo exhibit of their stories.
Peru is among many countries undergoing rapid aging, with the proportion of the population over the age of 60 projected to rise from 9.2 percent in 2014 to 22.7 percent in 2050. Advances in medicine, improvements in sanitation and economic prosperity have led to longer life expectancies, while family planning has resulted in falling birth rates across the globe. In low and middle-income families, rapid aging can be a double-edged sword due to limited resource availability, deteriorating family support and i
October 5, 2016 / Viewfind
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Pulitzer Center student fellows travel the world to report on issues that affect us all—telling stories that might otherwise go untold. This exhibit features selected work by student fellows, shot on...