Issue

Population & Migration

Population and migration issues are fraught with moral positions, confusion, and unexpected connections.

We cannot talk about population growth without also discussing decline; or contraception, without faith and medical technology. It is the mother of cross-cutting issues—at the intersection of economics, environment, gender roles, culture, politics, and religion. The population question is about the possibility and necessity of balancing the needs of nature and human civilization—and whether we can hope to or should have any say over the process.

The issue is global. Overpopulation of one region will seek release in an under-populated region. Stronger economies will be a magnet for those from weaker economies. Local carbon emissions will increase temperatures and change global weather patterns, disrupting food supplies and sowing insecurity. Diseases that begin in crowded slums can travel the world. Aging populations could lead to long-term economic depression, decreasing our ability to address the great problems we face such as environmental degradation.

Changing demographics in countries where men far outnumber the women often leads to human trafficking. Basic human rights are abused in countries where entire communities live without citizenship rights—unable to vote, own property, travel, work legally, or attend school.
Pulitzer Center grantees look at the effects of migration on climate and business, the efforts of immigrants to preserve their cultural identity, and the sacrifices they make in leaving family behind. Our journalists ask tough questions: How do refugees mobilize to take care of themselves when aid agencies fail?

Population & Migration exposes the risks and dangers refugees and migrants face as they leave one nation to seek a better home and a fresh start—only to find more obstacles and new threats. Resettlement presents its own set of challenges; hopes and promises prove illusory.

Population & Migration

February 22, 2017

The East African Migrant Smuggling Trail

Michael Scott Moore

Smugglers along the trail from East Africa to Europe, through Libya, tend to look after their own. Are former Somali pirates running Somali migrants?

January 13, 2017

Singapore Runaways

Xyza Bacani

Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?

January 04, 2017

China's Human Snakes Return

Rong Xiaoqing

Why are people who were smuggled to the U.S. from a rural high school in China three decades ago now going back to China?

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

December 20, 2016

The Missing Migrants: Families Search for Answers

Aaron Nelsen, Julysa Sosa

For years Central Americans have transited Mexico en route to the United States, many are never heard from again. In a country teeming with the disappeared, Central American mothers search for theirs.

December 19, 2016

Finding Home

Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni

Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.

December 26, 2016|

Meet the Journalist: Emily Gogolak

Emily Gogolak, from the field in Tegucigalpa, discusses her reporting on violence against women in Honduras and the deportations of mothers and children from immigration detention centers in Texas.

October 01, 2016|

Meet the Journalist: Sonia Shah

Tens of thousands of people fleeing bombs and beheadings are trapped in squalid refugee camps and ad hoc settlements across Greece. Will the country's tattered health system be able to prevent an epidemic?

January 18, 2017|

Pulitzer Center Visits West Coast

Pulitzer Center journalists Misha Friedman, Jon Cohen and Amy Maxmen spoke to 425 people about their work featured in the e-book "To End AIDS" at different events in the San Francisco area last week.