Issue

On War and Peace

Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from On War and Peace examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

On War and Peace

Libya: The Rebirth of a Nation

The revolution that toppled the regime of Col. Moammar Qaddafi brought Libya a sense of pride, hope and renewed engagement with the West, but ahead lies the challenge of building a democratic framework.

In Iraq, Looking at What’s Been Left Behind

American forces are withdrawing from Iraq, bringing a painful chapter in the history of both countries to a close while raising new questions about the shape of post-U.S. Iraq.

Ivory Coast: Elections Turn to War

Instead of a return to peace and prosperity, Ivory Coast’s long-delayed presidential elections marked a return to brutal conflict—and with it, a severe humanitarian crisis.

Afghanistan by Donkey

During the year that is supposed to determine Afghanistan’s future, Anna Badkhen gives readers a longer look at a deeply fissured nation that has endured war almost incessantly for millennia.

The Untold Quiet of Kurdistan

What the Vietnamese photographer Lam Duc-Hein first imagined of Iraq were tanks and violence, surges and refugees. But in Iraqi Kurdistan he found something different and beautiful.

The Waterkeeper of Iraq

Water scarcity is becoming an increasingly pressing issue in the country's north, but one man is hoping to change that.

This Week: The Rise of the Corporate Army

This week, an investigation into the privatization of government armies in Palestinian territories, a glimpse of life in North Korea, and our video "Facing Risk" highlights the dangers of freelance journalism.

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